What do you read?

I re read the Famous Five books recently. Sigh, I still want to be part of their gang & go off on adventures on Kirrin Island with Timmy the dog. Anne sounds a wet pain in the A*** though
 
I re read the Famous Five books recently. Sigh, I still want to be part of their gang & go off on adventures on Kirrin Island with Timmy the dog. Anne sounds a wet pain in the A*** though
I thought that too. She annoyed me in the books and I was alot younger when I read them.
 

karen b

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Yep, I did that for 'The Terror' - the book is brilliant, the series ending is meh...

Roy Grace... nope I pictured him different.
I can't remember the actors name who I thought would make a good Grace, but it's not the one playing him :laughing:

Apparently the author said that John Simm was exactly as they had pictured Grace.
 
I like Jostein Gaarder particularly the solitaire and Christmas mysteries.
And flatterland by Ian Stewart, an extension of A A Abbott's Flatland.
A lot of C S Lewis but particularly the Magician's Nephew and Dawn Treader. His biography was interesting too.
Older Rupert annuals for the cranky technology, almost steam punk in places. Some quite surreal stuff in there. Small pieces of light blue stuff held down by weights were in fact purified sky metal, made by the usual crank in the woods. Once the weight was removed, being less dense than air it flew back up where it should be. Simples.
Lots of tech books on engineering and electronics etc.
 
Anything Pratchett, the Xenogenesis trilogy by Octavia Butler, most CJ Cherryh, any Lois McMaster Bujold, I could go on for a while here... One of the best kids' books was The Talking Parcel by Gerald Durrell, it really encouraged me to never be put off by long or unusual words (they get lonely and fade away if not used, so it's best to give them an airing whenever you can, apparently :laughing:). Loved the Lensman series as a teen, can't stand to read them now. Oh and if you like a bit of weird, go with Frances Hardinge, her love of language and oddity shines through. My eldest was boggled when I explained that the Victorian penchant for photographing the dead in lifelike poses, as described in 'The Lie Tree', was actually a thing...
 
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