Vaccine reaction

A model of one of my photographer friends had the AZ injection a few weeks ago, felt the usual aches and pains but was fine after a few days. Two weeks later she felt really unwell (no previous illness). Tests were done and it was discovered she had high white blood cell count... she died a few days ago aged 39.
There's something about this today in the Independent - online
 
It's likely to be a mixture - some people susceptible to such things are tipped over by the vaccine, some suffer direct effects of the vaccine and some just happened to be dying or suffering from a serious condition along the way. This is why they've been examining each age group and doing a risk register, looking at the risks of harm from the vaccine, versus that of not having it, which of course changes as virus levels fall and rise around the country. I also had no serious side effects from the vaccine, but my cousin suffered effects similar to a stroke, which his doctors are presently tentatively linking to the AZ vaccine as there were no other risk factors around at the time identified as of yet.
 

CovTech

Lvl 37 Alchemist
COMMITTEE
Had mine last week
Had a sore spot on my arm (weirdly further up the arm than the jab site) for about 10 hours
 
When I had my Pfizer jab on Saturday, a couple of weeks ago, the pain in the arm developed quite quickly.
About 5h after having the shot it was quite achy (especially when lifting it up), it continued to be painful the next day (Sunday). On Monday it was noticeably less achy.
By Tuesday I forgot all about it :laughing:
 
First Pfizer jab on Thursday morning, went alright, no reaction initially, sat my 15 minutes okay then hit the deck like a bag of sh*te after standing up. :laughing:

100% the fault of anxiety and being overwhelmed by it all though rather than the vaccine! No severe reaction, but a day in bed on Friday with the usual shivers/aches etc.

My second dose is in August.
 
AZ. First jab, i wasn't even sure I had been spiked. Felt nothing at all and no sore arm or lump. 12 hours later I went to bed early as I felt very shaky. 24 hours later, repeat. Second jab, I knew it had happened but no reaction at all. Except, for both jabs, I had a very slight metallic taste in my mouth about 8 hours later.
 
I'm a bit later over here in Oz but had mine (AZ) the first one a few weeks ago - no reaction except for the sore arm. What we are now finding though is that as the younger ones are being given Pfizer and can therefore have their 2nd jab a lot earlier the 'oldies' aren't as well covered and Victoria has just gone into lockdown again.
 
What are everyone's experiences of reaction to vaccine ?
I had Pfizer. 1st one. In bed for a day very bad chills( ffffffreeeezing) temperature fluctuations, slightly achey.
Had 2nd on Sunday. Been off for 2 days, feels like flu. Glands up, sore skin, the lot. That or my sons beat me up during the night. Either or. ;)
A friend said it's put her off having it, but rather a few days discomfort than
who-knows-what reaction to Covid eh?!
I have had two Astra vaccines and both times the side effects were tiredness for a few days, still went to work
 

Nick Mitchener

COMMITTEE
In all honesty, I feel that already having COVID, should be good enough for my immune system. I do recall there are tests to see if you have antibodies for it though?

You should still have the jab. The innoculation will protect you against variants that you did not have, and provides a far better immune response than having caught Covid.
 
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First Pfizer jab on Thursday morning, went alright, no reaction initially, sat my 15 minutes okay then hit the deck like a bag of sh*te after standing up. :laughing:

100% the fault of anxiety and being overwhelmed by it all though rather than the vaccine! No severe reaction, but a day in bed on Friday with the usual shivers/aches etc.

My second dose is in August.
aaw poor you. I didn't quite faint but did have a funny turn and started to hypo-ventilate due to anxiety and terror of needles.
Hope you are OK now:love:
I got my next one end of the month, Already stressing a bit
 
First Pfizer jab on Thursday morning, went alright, no reaction initially, sat my 15 minutes okay then hit the deck like a bag of sh*te after standing up. :laughing:

100% the fault of anxiety and being overwhelmed by it all though rather than the vaccine! No severe reaction, but a day in bed on Friday with the usual shivers/aches etc.

My second dose is in August.
Oof, Bee! :surprised: Glad you got away with minimal side-effects though.
 
I've had 1st dose of pfizer. First day sore arm but felt great, second day got all cold and shivery and the following day cold and shivery again and super tired. Still went to work, it wasn't awful just felt knackered and a bit rough.
 
I've had my first of my Astra jabs. I was fine for the first 7 hours, then got bad chills and headache that lasted overnight (with attempts to sleep). By the morning my temperature felt a bit off but the aching had stopped and I was just tired. Hopefully my second isn't as bad, it's booked for half term!
Update: I have now had my second AZ, with no reaction other than a slightly achy arm, and even that is much less than the first one. No hint of a fever or anything this time round.
 
Second Oxford yeterday
So much better than awful reaction first time round
Not right today just feel off but managed to get to school
 
You should still have the jab. The innoculation will protect you against variants that you did not have, and provides a far better immune response than having caught Covid.
A vaccination will provide more of an immune response then actually relying on my body to fight off the infection?!?! Are all different types of variants in this vaccine, and if they are, wouldn't/shouldn't we be getting back to normality sooner considering all those vulnerable people now have the jab?
 
A vaccination will provide more of an immune response then actually relying on my body to fight off the infection?!?! Are all different types of variants in this vaccine, and if they are, wouldn't/shouldn't we be getting back to normality sooner considering all those vulnerable people now have the jab?
I think the problem is we don't know how well the vaccinations will protect against potential mutations and who will be vulnerable. Until the majority of the world have some sort of immunity outbreaks could keep occurring. The more the virus travels around the more mutations can occur. Similar to flu but most of us have some immunity to flu variations, gained over our lifetime.
 
So many things to unpack...

1. "A vaccination will provide more of an immune response then actually relying on my body to fight off the infection?!?!" -
Two things to address here. Firstly your body doesn't have to produce a better immune response when vaccinated vs when infected. The same immune response is more than adequate (although I've read some articles that claim that vaccine obtained immunity tends to be more lasting)
Secondly: if you rely on "your body fighting off the infection" you are still the source of infection. You continue spreading it to others and give the virus the opportunity to mutate.
Additionally, even if you get infected after being vaccinated (given that no current vaccine has 100% efficacy) you will not get the most severe symptoms and you will not be as infectious to others. At least that's what the initial data of vaccinated people is showing.

2. Fear of new variants is not a valid reason to delay vaccination.
- the more people will get vaccinated the less people get infected the smaller the chance for virus to mutate
- all mutations aren't equal. To my knowledge all the vaccines at the moment are targeting the spike protein of the virus. So only significant mutations in this part of it's genetic code matter when it comes to vaccine efficacy.

3. What people seem to rug sweep mostly at the moment is the fact that the double shot of the vaccine is not the end to our vaccinations.
The natural immunity to covid apparently lasts between 3-6 months on average. Given that vaccine immunity may last a bit longer, we might be lucky if we end up with an annual booster. On the plus side, said booster will update us on the new variants.

Apologies for the long read, but the last posts read a bit too like "lets wait and see..." and this is exactly the attitude that got us in all that mess in the first place....
 
So many things to unpack...

1. "A vaccination will provide more of an immune response then actually relying on my body to fight off the infection?!?!" -
Two things to address here. Firstly your body doesn't have to produce a better immune response when vaccinated vs when infected. The same immune response is more than adequate (although I've read some articles that claim that vaccine obtained immunity tends to be more lasting)
Secondly: if you rely on "your body fighting off the infection" you are still the source of infection. You continue spreading it to others and give the virus the opportunity to mutate.
Additionally, even if you get infected after being vaccinated (given that no current vaccine has 100% efficacy) you will not get the most severe symptoms and you will not be as infectious to others. At least that's what the initial data of vaccinated people is showing.

2. Fear of new variants is not a valid reason to delay vaccination.
- the more people will get vaccinated the less people get infected the smaller the chance for virus to mutate
- all mutations aren't equal. To my knowledge all the vaccines at the moment are targeting the spike protein of the virus. So only significant mutations in this part of it's genetic code matter when it comes to vaccine efficacy.

3. What people seem to rug sweep mostly at the moment is the fact that the double shot of the vaccine is not the end to our vaccinations.
The natural immunity to covid apparently lasts between 3-6 months on average. Given that vaccine immunity may last a bit longer, we might be lucky if we end up with an annual booster. On the plus side, said booster will update us on the new variants.

Apologies for the long read, but the last posts read a bit too like "lets wait and see..." and this is exactly the attitude that got us in all that mess in the first place....
Agree, I had the Covid back in march 2020, still went for my vaccine and will have the 2nd next month. It isn't just about you. it's about protecting society, your loved ones and potentially not being a spreader and getting things under control.
As yet the antibodies last 8 months, from research I have read, It may prove to be longer which would be fab. Any increase in antibody immunity from vaccines is a winner and will help us all.
hate needles but will have a booster next year if it is necessary.
 
Agree, I had the Covid back in march 2020, still went for my vaccine and will have the 2nd next month. It isn't just about you. it's about protecting society, your loved ones and potentially not being a spreader and getting things under control.
As yet the antibodies last 8 months, from research I have read, It may prove to be longer which would be fab. Any increase in antibody immunity from vaccines is a winner and will help us all.

Hopefully T cell and B memory will kick in but it will probably mean being infectious.
hate needles but will have a booster next year if it is necessary.
There is a nasal one being trailed similar to the one they give the kids for flu.
 
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