Unknown Physics Kit - interferometer?

Another "what on earth is this"? This has my HoD and I stumped. It looks like some kind of interferometer maybe? But how does it work? The screen in the centre (removable) is like thick blotting paper.

189603404_4056366077758289_86354125848065648_n.jpg190696116_4056366277758269_1193887152916308630_n.jpg190753964_4056366157758281_6019132985822290344_n.jpg191178082_4056366207758276_8147569556747230190_n.jpg192233988_4056366121091618_4125438752859385250_n.jpg
 
yes - if you shine a laser through the "eyepiece" you get an interference pattern on one side of the screen - but I think it's meant to be used the other way round. One teacher suggested pyrometer but it's not the standard format for one of those. Michelson is the closest I can find for style but I don't think it's meant to be used that way round.
 
It does look like a mini Michelson. I would suggest the 'eyepiece' is a part of the collimation and focusing that usually occurs before light enters such a thing - hence why the beam splitter (prism) is there, this is the first component the light should encounter. The cap and viewscreen do seem to look like they're meant to be looked through. Unless someone just left the eyepiece in the wrong hole or found that using it helped improve the pattern? It might also be used to look at different sources, in which case the eyepiece would be needed to act like a mini telescope, bringing the light into the device.
 
I should have said there is an identical cap and hole to look at the other side of the screen - and the whole thing swivels through about 340 deg around the central axis.
 
Okay - have now played some more with this and done some research. It seems to be a photometer. Shine white light in the 2 holes. Depending on which is brighter, you either get a shadow around a central bright spot or a central dark spot. When they are the same intensity the image is all white.
 
Okay - have now played some more with this and done some research. It seems to be a photometer. Shine white light in the 2 holes. Depending on which is brighter, you either get a shadow around a central bright spot or a central dark spot. When they are the same intensity the image is all white.
I wasn't a million miles away then?
 
Top