Simple acid/metal experiment question

General sci teacher asked me to make up some solutions to react with copper oxide powder to measure heat output. Just says dilute acids so I've made up 0.5M H2SO4 and 0.5M HCl. Will this be enough or too dilute?
Also is it usually Copper II oxide or Copper I oxide that's used or does it not matter?
I'm new to this so glad that you all share your experience.
 
I haven't specifically come across this investigation but my initial thought is that the copper (II) oxide/sulphuric acid reaction which is used as a method of salt making (see RSC) requires heat input so is most likely not especially exothermic. There is an investigation (was an old ISA IIRC) in which you added different metals to a copper sulphate solution. Sorry I couldn't specifically answer your query.

lee
 
This is a typical case of teacher not knowing what they're asking for it seems and hoping the tech can decipher the symbols...
Copper oxide is not a good example in general to show exothermic nature because of its low solubility. In fact you need to heat up the acid to get it to react at a decent pace, thereby eliminating the whole point.

If he really wants a metal oxide to react with an acid, you would have to try something like sodium oxide or potassium oxide which are more soluble and try something like 2M HCl for a decent temp change just going by intuition. This would be my starting point and then go from there....

Otherwise if they aren't fussed, they can do mg ribbon + 0.5M HCl which will give a nice temp increase.
 
I did test some copper I oxide and the tube got slightly warm with vigorous shaking but not worth measuring. Could do Mg that's definitely more productive, but would iron oxide be a better alternative? Perhaps that's what they wanted?
 
I did test some copper I oxide and the tube got slightly warm with vigorous shaking but not worth measuring. Could do Mg that's definitely more productive, but would iron oxide be a better alternative? Perhaps that's what they wanted?

Try sodium or potassium oxide. Iron oxide you will have similar issues with copper oxide.
 
Are you certain that meant the oxides, as far as i understand you will see very little if any reaction unless you heat them. Being oxides they are very stable compounds, you would have to go to the group one or two oxides for more reactivity. Just done calcium oxide and water to show temp change.
 
just had this cryptic request, zinc and copper sulphate with catalyst going for squeaky pop test. can any one explain this one to me, also has any one got the exploding custard powder demo to work and how. Tried it last year and just got a load of custard powder puffed all over the bench.
 
just had this cryptic request, zinc and copper sulphate with catalyst going for squeaky pop test. can any one explain this one to me, also has any one got the exploding custard powder demo to work and how. Tried it last year and just got a load of custard powder puffed all over the bench.

Hmmm zinc and copper sulfate does not give a squeaky pop... you mean zinc and hydrochloric acid? Copper sulfate acts as the catalyst if added.
 
just had this cryptic request, zinc and copper sulphate with catalyst going for squeaky pop test. can any one explain this one to me, also has any one got the exploding custard powder demo to work and how. Tried it last year and just got a load of custard powder puffed all over the bench.
What Emil said
We do a few zinc granules in sulfuric acid with 5ml of copper sulfate and compare that to the same without the copper sulfate being added
 
Exploding custard (icing sugar gave me better results) can is pretty much trial and errorwith candle flame position and height, input method and getting a good puff cloud.
Had a few good bangs and the lid contacting the ceiling more than once.
The icing sugar also gave a lovely colour coming from the can and a gorgeous smell of caramel toffee
 
thanks for the replies, to blow the powder I will need to find some sort of bellows, as we should no longer blow by mouth through a tube.
 
Bicycle pump is wot I used.

A plastic pipette with the bulb cut in half longwise to make a wee totty spoon and puffed wiv a short blast from the pump worked better than the powder lying on the bottom of the can.

Too big a blast just blows out the candle.
 
just had this cryptic request, zinc and copper sulphate with catalyst going for squeaky pop test. can any one explain this one to me, also has any one got the exploding custard powder demo to work and how. Tried it last year and just got a load of custard powder puffed all over the bench.
:offtopic:
Now there are loads of replies about the custard tin
 
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