Respirator cartridge for Bromine?

Well I just found under an unopened Bromine Water bottle (which is still sealed in a bag) a deposit of solid (powder)
 
I absolutely loathe Bromine. You're right to be afraid of pure Bromine, it is very nasty stuff. It doesn't come up often for me thankfully, and usually only when someone wants Bromine Water, but I hate mixing it. We have little ampoules of the stuff, and I hate breaking them because the glass never seems to behave itself. Bromine water is much less nasty, though 0.2M is pretty close to its maximum solubility. I keep my stock solution diluted to 1/10th of that (0.02M), and dilute it another 1/10th (0.002M) for handing out for the teachers to demo, as per the Hazcard recommendation. As the stock solution ages, vapour escapes and its concentration drops, so I keep it stored in the fume cupboard itself and dilute it less over time to compensate, and test it (time allowing) to make sure it still performs as needed. But yes, you absolutely need a working fume cupboard, (preferably ducted, though mine isn't), and ensure that it is rated to handle Bromine. If you don't have that, refuse to work with it, and learn to say no. Your safety is important.

Sulphuric acid isn't really an issue vapour-wise, but I remember on my first day getting a whiff of concentrated HCl. You soon learn not to do it again.

I have stopped using pure bromine ampules to make bromine water. Instead, for 100mls of bromine water, I dissolve 2.2g sodium bromide in 20ml 1M HCL, add 16ml sodium hypochlorite and finally 64ml distilled water.
 
I have stopped using pure bromine ampules to make bromine water. Instead, for 100mls of bromine water, I dissolve 2.2g sodium bromide in 20ml 1M HCL, add 16ml sodium hypochlorite and finally 64ml distilled water.
I do like little roundabout ways of getting to things, but would it be cheaper and less time-intensive to just buy the diluted bromine water I wonder? I know that I don't have Sodium Hypochlorite in my stores, so I'd need to order that in. That said, I imagine your method negates the problem of it not keeping well over long periods, and thus probably better if it's seldom requested (and usually only by one teacher)
 
I do like little roundabout ways of getting to things, but would it be cheaper and less time-intensive to just buy the diluted bromine water I wonder? I know that I don't have Sodium Hypochlorite in my stores, so I'd need to order that in. That said, I imagine your method negates the problem of it not keeping well over long periods, and thus probably better if it's seldom requested (and usually only by one teacher)
If you have a look at CLEAPSS recipe book there's another method for making bromine water that doesn't use sodium hypochlorite or bromine ampules - I can't remember which chemicals off the top of my head but it's perfect and really safe!
 
If you have a look at CLEAPSS recipe book there's another method for making bromine water that doesn't use sodium hypochlorite or bromine ampules - I can't remember which chemicals off the top of my head but it's perfect and really safe!
Just seen the other method. It needs Potassium Bromate. I'm lacking that too. *opens Purchase order template* :laughing:
 
This is the solid deposit around the bagged bromine water container,

The bad news is that it is located next to ethanol, a not so wise choice,

How do approach this kind of solid deposit in order to dispose it? Is an FRSM Type IIR mask an adequate protection from any dust of this? For ammonium chloride?
IMG_20201026_085747.jpg
 
After reading all of the above i do wonder what all of you would have done working in a works chemical lab in the 1980s!
Far more dangerous stuff. School chemicals are really quite safe.

Most dangerous chemicals have been eliminated from schools by the late 90s and early 00s.
Realy there is only bromine and possibly 2.4DNP. If you follow the rules there should be no worries.

The reason for me leaving, company closed its midlands plant and moved to Wales in the late 80s.
 
After reading all of the above i do wonder what all of you would have done working in a works chemical lab in the 1980s!
Far more dangerous stuff. School chemicals are really quite safe.

Most dangerous chemicals have been eliminated from schools by the late 90s and early 00s.
Realy there is only bromine and possibly 2.4DNP. If you follow the rules there should be no worries.

The reason for me leaving, company closed its midlands plant and moved to Wales in the late 80s.
Agreed, a great deal of the nasties went from our school in the early 2000s. And yes, there is a big difference between the perception between dangerous chemicals in a school setting versus a industry/ research lab environment.
 
This is the solid deposit around the bagged bromine water container,

The bad news is that it is located next to ethanol, a not so wise choice,

How do approach this kind of solid deposit in order to dispose it? Is an FRSM Type IIR mask an adequate protection from any dust of this? For ammonium chloride?

do you mean this

1603721521634.png

looks like vermiculite from packing to me.

For ammonium chloride?

the hazcard says.

• Ammonium chloride: This is the white deposit often seen on bottles in poorly-ventilated stores. Wear eye protection and gloves when wiping down bottles.
 
In case it hasn't been mentioned earlier in the thread: if you are weary of handling pure bromine/bromine capsules there are 2 alternative methods of making bromine water listed in CLEAPSS Recipe book.
http://science.cleapss.org.uk/Resource/RB017-Bromine-water-opening-bromine-ampoules.pdf
I haven't used pure bromine in almost a decade, and I'm not missing it one bit.
If the only reason you use bromine is to make bromine water (for halogen displacement reactions or testing for unsaturation) just follow method 2 in the recipe book. You will still need to use fume cupboard but all the risks associated with handling bromine liquid will be eliminated.

Also, for those frustrated with bromine water "going off" (aka going pale) quickly: I keep mine in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge, lasts indefinitely.
 
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