Respirator cartridge for Bromine?

Greetings to everyone,

I would like to buy a respirator with cartridges to protect me form acid vapours ammonia and bromine,

In regards to acids and ammonia I have find one good but when it comes to bromine? They don't mention Bromine anywhere on the catalogues

Regards
 
Do you not have a fume hood?
As Jasper75 said above. You shouldn't be in position where it is possible to even breathe in Bromine fumes!
Personally, hate handling the stuff. Our old chem tech used to wail, " WHY for the love of God, WHY?" when it was requested!:D
 
Well in regards to hydrochloric and sulphuric acid I work with the fume cupboard doesn't protect 100%

For example for preparing a 2M H2SO4 form 36% I thing I need some more protection
 
In carrying out Sulphuric acid dilutions you should not need to use a fume cupboard or respirator, what I do do is cool the flask in a bowl of water when adding the acid to the flask containing water.
If for using fuming HCL you feel the fume cupboard is not working then it should be serviced. I have the filters the fume cupboards here changed every 3 years even if they are still functioning.
 
In carrying out Sulphuric acid dilutions you should not need to use a fume cupboard or respirator, what I do do is cool the flask in a bowl of water when adding the acid to the flask containing water.

I am single technician, some times I need to do this asap but safe, so that's why I feel I need something extra
 
In carrying out Sulphuric acid dilutions you should not need to use a fume cupboard or respirator, what I do do is cool the flask in a bowl of water when adding the acid to the flask containing water.
If for using fuming HCL you feel the fume cupboard is not working then it should be serviced. I have the filters the fume cupboards here changed every 3 years even if they are still functioning.
I do the ice method, make ice with distilled water, drip h2so4 into ice, ice melts the add to flask or measuring jug to make up volume.
 
I am a lone tech, so do understand. But will say with the Sulphuric acid you have minimal vapour issue. With the others in concentrated form I agree there is, but a good fume cupboard is what is needed. If you have a major vapour/ gas issue then leave the prep room straight away.
If the school does not maintain the fume cupboards then refuse to do the dilutions and buy them ready diluted.
 
I am a lone tech, so do understand. But will say with the Sulphuric acid you have minimal vapour issue. With the others in concentrated form I agree there is, but a good fume cupboard is what is needed. If you have a major vapour/ gas issue then leave the prep room straight away.
If the school does not maintain the fume cupboards then refuse to do the dilutions and buy them ready diluted.

Ok maybe it's an overkill then, maybe I got very afraid,

In regards to Bromine we have Bromine Water and Bromine Water 0,2 M which I suppose isn't as dangerous as Bromine itself
 
I absolutely loathe Bromine. You're right to be afraid of pure Bromine, it is very nasty stuff. It doesn't come up often for me thankfully, and usually only when someone wants Bromine Water, but I hate mixing it. We have little ampoules of the stuff, and I hate breaking them because the glass never seems to behave itself. Bromine water is much less nasty, though 0.2M is pretty close to its maximum solubility. I keep my stock solution diluted to 1/10th of that (0.02M), and dilute it another 1/10th (0.002M) for handing out for the teachers to demo, as per the Hazcard recommendation. As the stock solution ages, vapour escapes and its concentration drops, so I keep it stored in the fume cupboard itself and dilute it less over time to compensate, and test it (time allowing) to make sure it still performs as needed. But yes, you absolutely need a working fume cupboard, (preferably ducted, though mine isn't), and ensure that it is rated to handle Bromine. If you don't have that, refuse to work with it, and learn to say no. Your safety is important.

Sulphuric acid isn't really an issue vapour-wise, but I remember on my first day getting a whiff of concentrated HCl. You soon learn not to do it again.
 
Ok maybe it's an overkill then, maybe I got very afraid,

In regards to Bromine we have Bromine Water and Bromine Water 0,2 M which I suppose isn't as dangerous as Bromine itself
You really don't need to be very afraid of anything you're doing in your job. Just use a fume hood for anything that creates fumes and don't do anything ASAP. Speed and safety don't mix. I really wouldn't get a respirator for bromine as per your title, if you do that in your prep room it would be inhabitable for quite some time and at some point you'll have to take the respirator off then what will you do??
 
You really don't need to be very afraid of anything you're doing in your job. Just use a fume hood for anything that creates fumes and don't do anything ASAP. Speed and safety don't mix. I really wouldn't get a respirator for bromine as per your title, if you do that in your prep room it would be inhabitable for quite some time and at some point you'll have to take the respirator off then what will you do??
Also wouldn't protect anyone else poking their head round the prep room door to ask for something. As others have said, functional fume hood or buy in diluted.
 
Greetings to everyone,

I would like to buy a respirator with cartridges to protect me form acid vapours ammonia and bromine,

In regards to acids and ammonia I have find one good but when it comes to bromine? They don't mention Bromine anywhere on the catalogues

Regards
You should have a fully functioning fume hood [checked annually] to carry out any work with bromine and similar dangerous chemicals. I'd recommend reading this from the HSE:


Your fume hood should be of a sufficient standard that you should not need to wear a respirator. If you need to wear a respirator, you require training and a face-fit test for the particular respirator. Additionally, you should be having occupational health monitoring annually. Does your employer do this for you? They should, it's the law.
 
I do the ice method, make ice with distilled water, drip h2so4 into ice, ice melts the add to flask or measuring jug to make up volume.

So how iced distilled water protect us from the fumes?

How many ice cubes should be used for 1 L from 36% H2SO4 ?
 
So how iced distilled water protect us from the fumes?

How many ice cubes should be used for 1 L from 36% H2SO4 ?
The ice won't protect you from fumes people are just saying using this method doesn't create fumes. The ice volume doesn't matter you make it up to volume when melted, in your volumetric flask.
 
Not that many chemicals that frighten me these days, after working in science for 49 years, BUT,:eek: the dreaded Bromine is one of them!
I told office staff once that if you think about it, we techs should be paid more, not only because we are handling chemicals, but because if we went rogue we could take out the school :laughing:
 
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