Rescue dog

Anyone on here had a rescue dog?
I collected my pooch on Friday. So early days. But like I have heard a lot of rescue are, she doesn't have a clue what 'play' is.
Any tips on getting them to engage?
Not fussed about treats so that makes it difficult incentivewise. Looked at me like a loony when I threw a ball for her. I was fetching quite well though! :laughing:
She 'mouths' our arms a lot. Responds to 'No' & stops when she does that.
We tried looking up phrases in Romanian in case she had been taught anything at all. Nope.
Like I say, early days, but tips welcome.
 

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Assuming she has come over from Romania I would say just give her time. It is a big change for her and she needs time to decompress and settle in. You'll probably find once she is comfortable she will start to engage more, it will come.
Just give her plenty of love and positive praise and just be very patient with her.
Well done for taking on a rescue, she's a very lucky dog :)
 
Lots of attention and patience is the best thing. Our dog is a rescue and is a totally different pup from when we got him 4 years ago
 
Anyone on here had a rescue dog?
I collected my pooch on Friday. So early days. But like I have heard a lot of rescue are, she doesn't have a clue what 'play' is.
Any tips on getting them to engage?
Not fussed about treats so that makes it difficult incentivewise. Looked at me like a loony when I threw a ball for her. I was fetching quite well though! :laughing:
She 'mouths' our arms a lot. Responds to 'No' & stops when she does that.
We tried looking up phrases in Romanian in case she had been taught anything at all. Nope.
Like I say, early days, but tips welcome.

Sorry, but this cracked me up!:D
 
My cousin is a vet and says the eastern european rescue dog thing is a real worry as although the organisations fronting this look legit they are part of a process (knowingly or unknowingly) where dogs are being literally rounded up from the streets and brought over to the UK in vans with little or no attention to their welfare en route with many cases of dogs dying in transit, to supply a UK consumer desire to rescue dogs from abroad. Lots have really difficult behaviour issues and have to be put down before any chance of being re-homed. So although it looks like a really good thing to do it is driving an industry which does not have animal welfare front and centre. Plus there are 130,000 dogs coming into rescue centres alone in the UK from our own supply. Having said all this - wishing you the best of luck with your doggy.
 
I rescued my english bull terrier three years ago. I would just let them settle in first, it will take a couple of months for them to get to know you and trust you. Have a few toys in his bed/cage and let him come to you when he is ready. I would say getting them to learn dog etiquette whilst on walks is more important than playing with humans. Learning basic commands and teaching recall is a must. But I really shouldn't be giving any advice as my ebt doesn't listen to anything I say unless i'm bribing him with food. :laughing: Also once you have found a treat that he loves and responds too, only give it to him on walks. That makes it high value.
 
We've found with our friends dog who didn't want to play, if we played with the toys around her, she gradually got more interested. She's still not always super playful but that definitely helped for her :laughing:
 
My cousin is a vet and says the eastern european rescue dog thing is a real worry as although the organisations fronting this look legit they are part of a process (knowingly or unknowingly) where dogs are being literally rounded up from the streets and brought over to the UK in vans with little or no attention to their welfare en route with many cases of dogs dying in transit, to supply a UK consumer desire to rescue dogs from abroad. Lots have really difficult behaviour issues and have to be put down before any chance of being re-homed. So although it looks like a really good thing to do it is driving an industry which does not have animal welfare front and centre. Plus there are 130,000 dogs coming into rescue centres alone in the UK from our own supply. Having said all this - wishing you the best of luck with your doggy.
Honestly, I did my research. The rescue is British & work closely with Battersea here in Uk & actually have several kennels & branches here too.
All their rescues are very well documented, all their dogs registered with DEFRA, They are in regular contact & have given loads of advice but I thought someone on here may have some first hand tips. Not criticism :(
Maybe Vets & rescues here should look into their processes that mean no one can have a dog unless they are retired, unemployed or well off!
We have been refused for: living in town (?!), because I work, even though someone is at home all day, having cats, not having a porch on front of house, not having a front gate, and so on. My HoD had similar issues.
Even though I have had 2 dogs in the past. One with a severe illness that affected behaviour which we managed very well so that a dog who was given only 2 years to live, lived over 8 years very happily & healthily.
I know a rehoming officer from a rescue here & she said she would let me have dog in a heartbeat but their rules mean that she can't, they also freely admit that despite all their checks, they have dogs returned all the time.
 
I rescued my english bull terrier three years ago. I would just let them settle in first, it will take a couple of months for them to get to know you and trust you. Have a few toys in his bed/cage and let him come to you when he is ready. I would say getting them to learn dog etiquette whilst on walks is more important than playing with humans. Learning basic commands and teaching recall is a must. But I really shouldn't be giving any advice as my ebt doesn't listen to anything I say unless i'm bribing him with food. :laughing: Also once you have found a treat that he loves and responds too, only give it to him on walks. That makes it high value.
She can't go for a walk just yet. In the garden she walks to heel already. A real bright spark. She's learnt 'Sit', 'No' & Stop' in just a couple of days.
I'm ok with teaching commands. Just want her to learn to play, bless her. I was thinking maybe once lockdown or tiers relaxed we can mix more with friends with dogs. My friend that works with Battersea has given advice too. We'll get there. She's very affectionate & cuddly. Loves her grub & despite having a wonky leg, she is fast!
 
Some dogs never learn to play. I adopted a 7 year old dachshund 7 years ago from an acquaintance who was moving house...poor little thing had been loved, overfed and groomed but nobody had ever played with her. (She's also not terribly bright - two less brain cells and she'd be a cactus). She still hasn't really got a clue about toys and never lost the habit of licking her blankets (not stress-related - she appears to like the taste - I refer you to the other bracketed comment ;-) ) at least she's 4lbs lighter than when I got her and a happy, if not playful, dog!
 

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Some dogs never learn to play. I adopted a 7 year old dachshund 7 years ago from an acquaintance who was moving house...poor little thing had been loved, overfed and groomed but nobody had ever played with her. (She's also not terribly bright - two less brain cells and she'd be a cactus). She still hasn't really got a clue about toys and never lost the habit of licking her blankets (not stress-related - she appears to like the taste - I refer you to the other bracketed comment ;-) ) at least she's 4lbs lighter than when I got her and a happy, if not playful, dog!

One of our dogs is somewhat similar. She wasn't socialised properly in the first 8 weeks of life and this combination of nature and lack of early nurture means she is somewhat akin to an "autistic" dog. She is the sweetest, most gentle dog you could ever wish to meet but she just doesn't understand playing at all, even with other dogs. Couldn't get her to play with us as a puppy and nearly 14 years later she is still oblivious to the joys of play. She's a very sensitive soul (you can't raise your voice around her, even if not directed at her, you can't make loud noises, no clinking pots and pans etc) and if you pick her up she goes rigid like a board and doesn't move, although she's 24kg so we don't make a habit of lifting her!

I think some dogs just enjoy it more than others and it really depends on what your dog enjoys about their relationship with you. One of my dogs just adores any sort of input from me, be it play, tactile fuss and cuddles, going to classes or just simply talking to him, but one of my others is very much on her terms, she's point blank ignores me sometimes and will only play with toys for short bursts and only when she initiates it, the looks she gives me if I try to interact with her when she's not interested are hilarious - but ironically these two are mother and son! They are all so different.
 
Honestly, I did my research. The rescue is British & work closely with Battersea here in Uk & actually have several kennels & branches here too.
All their rescues are very well documented, all their dogs registered with DEFRA, They are in regular contact & have given loads of advice but I thought someone on here may have some first hand tips. Not criticism :(
Maybe Vets & rescues here should look into their processes that mean no one can have a dog unless they are retired, unemployed or well off!
We have been refused for: living in town (?!), because I work, even though someone is at home all day, having cats, not having a porch on front of house, not having a front gate, and so on. My HoD had similar issues.
Even though I have had 2 dogs in the past. One with a severe illness that affected behaviour which we managed very well so that a dog who was given only 2 years to live, lived over 8 years very happily & healthily.
I know a rehoming officer from a rescue here & she said she would let me have dog in a heartbeat but their rules mean that she can't, they also freely admit that despite all their checks, they have dogs returned all the time.
Can I ask the name of this rescue? Is it Bridging the Gap?
 

paul r

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My Terrier cross is a rescue , see picture . Got him as a puppy so was lucky and was able to train from an early age . Not as bright as the Labrador but neither am I ! He is the most loving companion though , he never leaves my side except for crisps and fuss !

If the dog has come from Romania , many of their dogs are not kept as pets but as guard dogs or are just let to roam so have lost their trust in humans . He probably needs to get used to you and then he will grow more confident . I know he is in good hands !
 
Some dogs never learn to play. I adopted a 7 year old dachshund 7 years ago from an acquaintance who was moving house...poor little thing had been loved, overfed and groomed but nobody had ever played with her. (She's also not terribly bright - two less brain cells and she'd be a cactus). She still hasn't really got a clue about toys and never lost the habit of licking her blankets (not stress-related - she appears to like the taste - I refer you to the other bracketed comment ;-) ) at least she's 4lbs lighter than when I got her and a happy, if not playful, dog!
love that!
Awww Bless. Well I'll start with a ball on a length of string & throw it for myself! If she tries I'll reward her ( with what I don't know !)
As long as they are happy.
 
My Terrier cross is a rescue , see picture . Got him as a puppy so was lucky and was able to train from an early age . Not as bright as the Labrador but neither am I ! He is the most loving companion though , he never leaves my side except for crisps and fuss !

If the dog has come from Romania , many of their dogs are not kept as pets but as guard dogs or are just let to roam so have lost their trust in humans . He probably needs to get used to you and then he will grow more confident . I know he is in good hands !
Thanks! She seems to like us. Does a dog version of a cuddle a lot. They had some info on her. May have been farm dog that was kicked out after her leg was broken, hence wonky leg. She was spotted many times by people I the village over a period of a few months before she was finally picked up by rescue. It was sort of a watch & wait situation. They've provided X rays of leg & vet info. This dog has more paperwork than me!
Certainy rubbish as a guard dog, parcels delivered a few times over weekend & she didn't even look up when there was knock.
 
Our Cocker Spaniel is a rescue. We got him when they thought he was about 2 years old so if their calculations are correct he's just turned 13. They didn't know much of his background but seemed to think he was crated most of the time while young children prodded him. I think he was given up when they realised he needed more than to sit in a crate for 24 hours :( But... their loss was definitely our gain. He has never been a day's trouble in 11 years and I adore him. He's never been a big toy/playing fan either. I'm guessing because his puppyhood was in the crate and he couldn't play even if he wanted to. He used to fetch a ball once or twice but then used to look at me as if to say " fetch it yourself" :D I'm sure with time and perseverance your new pooch will come round to playing but the main thing to remember is that you are providing everything she will ever want and need in life and that's something to be admired. Give yourself a big pat on the back :)
 
He used to fetch a ball once or twice but then used to look at me as if to say " fetch it yourself" :D
The dog we had when I was a kid was like that. My parents got her as a puppy, before they had me, so not a rescue. She had that same "fetch it yourself" look. I don't remember her ever playing with toys, but she was had a wonderful temperament, especially around me and my 2 younger brothers growing up.
 

paul r

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Thanks! She seems to like us. Does a dog version of a cuddle a lot. They had some info on her. May have been farm dog that was kicked out after her leg was broken, hence wonky leg. She was spotted many times by people I the village over a period of a few months before she was finally picked up by rescue. It was sort of a watch & wait situation. They've provided X rays of leg & vet info. This dog has more paperwork than me!
Certainy rubbish as a guard dog, parcels delivered a few times over weekend & she didn't even look up when there was knock.
That is good to hear . I have been to Romania and while some people look after their dogs many do not hence the rescue situation . Many people are also too poor to afford the Vet bills etc

Here are a few words in Romanian, you may have to look up how to pronounce them!
Sit = șezi sounds like Shez !
Lie = culcat
Stay = așteaptă sounds like astapta !
Heel = la picior

I have a labrador Retriever that is a non retriever . He just looks at you when you throw something for him . He is a master of cadging food from people though and can often be found in various seaside towns feasting on fish and chips ! The seagulls have no chance when he is around !

Let me know how you get on with her
 
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That is good to hear . I have been to Romania and while some people look after their dogs many do not hence the rescue situation . Many people are also too poor to afford the Vet bills etc

Here are a few words in Romanian, you may have to look up how to pronounce them!
Sit = șezi sounds like Shez !
Lie = culcat
Stay = așteaptă sounds like astapta !
Heel = la picior

I have a labrador Retriever that is a non retriever . He just looks at you when you throw something for him . He is a master of cadging food from people though and can often be found in various seaside towns feasting on fish and chips ! The seagulls have no chance when he is around !

Let me know how you get on with her
:laughing: Thanks! We thought that may be the case with the vet bills. Her leg healed on it's own untreated & she looks like she is just standing in a casual, leaning on one leg, kind of way.
 
Can I ask the name of this rescue? Is it Bridging the Gap?
It's Sadies. Set up by British Lady, run by British people. I found out about it from someone over our local lake/park during lockdown & checked it out with my friend from Battersea Dogs. She vouched for them & gace me the names of a few other 'legit' Romanian & Cypriot rescues too.
Actually, Battersea only had 10 dogs across all of it's sites during lockdown, the Collie rescue that I have been registered with for a couple of years only had 1 dog. ( a very pampered pooch I bet)
I called a few of the rescue that I am registered with here ( the few that have agreed I could have dog!) before going down Romanian route & was told that even though I have been with them for a very long time, there are still thousands in front of me. Some because they are happy with Staffies or Greyhounds or Chihuahuas. Having cats, most greyhounds are out. There are a lot of 'designer' dogs in rescue too, as people want them for their cuteness & don't treat them like they are dogs. Poor little mites.
 
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