Leaves for starch test?

Morning all,

Any good plant leaves that give good results for the testing for starch experiment?

I didn't work over the summer so I couldn't get to water all my plants unfortunately.

Many thanks :)
 

ajmc98

Don't lick, smell or touch it and you won't die.
We used Ivy last week as the geranium aren't in season and that worked well, I also found that 70% ethanol worked better than the pure IDA stuff.
 
The teacher doing this is in a normal classroom...

She is going to need hot water and the ethanol so I might just prepare the leaves myself.

 
I use growing basil from the supermarket. Blanches well and is usually grown under artificial light so still works at this time of year. I always throw a daylight bulb next to it the day before it is used too, for an extra boost.
 
Just as an added thing, have you tried pinning a narrow piece of card with a hole in it across the leaf and leaving it in daylight or under a lamp, that way you get the pattern for light and dark on the leaf. Works OK.
 
Just as an added thing, have you tried pinning a narrow piece of card with a hole in it across the leaf and leaving it in daylight or under a lamp, that way you get the pattern for light and dark on the leaf. Works OK.
I made the "LIGHT" template once.

This practical does lead to misconceptions, hence the move to the dreaded algal balls.
 
I use growing basil from the supermarket. Blanches well and is usually grown under artificial light so still works at this time of year. I always throw a daylight bulb next to it the day before it is used too, for an extra boost.
I pick loads of geranium leaves in summer & freeze them. The still work fine.
That said, there is a good display of geraniums in pots at front of school, they look in need of a haircut ;)
I also came back from a school shopping trip the other day with some geranium leaves in my pocket from the council displays.
 
Geraniums and more recently, Piggy Back plants. The latter produce loads of leaves and they're easy to look after and propagate.
 
I use growing basil from the supermarket. Blanches well and is usually grown under artificial light so still works at this time of year. I always throw a daylight bulb next to it the day before it is used too, for an extra boost.
Like the Basil idea - left overs can go in my dinner!
 
I pick loads of geranium leaves in summer & freeze them. The still work fine.
That said, there is a good display of geraniums in pots at front of school, they look in need of a haircut ;)
I also came back from a school shopping trip the other day with some geranium leaves in my pocket from the council displays.
I would never have thought of this! so you just unfreeze them and do the practical as normal? and it works well?
 
Geraniums and more recently, Piggy Back plants. The latter produce loads of leaves and they're easy to look after and propagate.
piggy back plants look brilliant and unusual, I dont suppose you might be able to send me a cutting of a piggyback plant would you please?
 
piggy back plants look brilliant and unusual, I dont suppose you might be able to send me a cutting of a piggyback plant would you please?
I don't suppose you'd be able to spare a cutting my way too please? I've been a very good little tech this year, honest ;). After the Christmas break, obviously. Happy to trade purple Tradescantia if it helps.
 
piggy back plants look brilliant and unusual, I dont suppose you might be able to send me a cutting of a piggyback plant would you please?
Sure. Message me with an address and I will pop some in the post to you. Pop the leaves in beakers of water, face up. Within a few weeks you should see some roots forming. Then pot them up. You can try pushing the base of the leaf into moist soil too.
 
I don't suppose you'd be able to spare a cutting my way too please? I've been a very good little tech this year, honest ;). After the Christmas break, obviously. Happy to trade purple Tradescantia if it helps.
Sure. Message me with an address and I will pop some in the post to you. Pop the leaves in beakers of water, face up. Within a few weeks you should see some roots forming. Then pot them up. You can try pushing the base of the leaf into moist soil too.
 
Sure. Message me with an address and I will pop some in the post to you. Pop the leaves in beakers of water, face up. Within a few weeks you should see some roots forming. Then pot them up. You can try pushing the base of the leaf into moist soil too.
Might I claim to have been a good little tech too please? I tried finding piggy-back plants online with little success and they sound fascinating. Happy to cover P&P.
 
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