Issue with HoD?

Hey everyone, thanks for your input!
This morning when she came in asking for a practical (that she hadn't booked!) she called me 'miss' again and I told her she can call me by 'jhw' in the prep room. Hopefully this will have sorted out the issue, as I've both addressed being called miss and given her a handy reminder of my name!
 
It does my nut in to be called Miss....I've worked here for 20 bloody years & they still can't be bothered to remember my name?!

I used to have my name on my lab coat, I'm quite happy for the kids to call me by my first name, actually they're usually nicer to you then as they see you as on their side somehow.
But for staff, who I see every day, to call me Miss? Nope not having it.

I don't like confrontation, but I am quite happy to pull someone up if I feel they are being rude.

It's a similar thing when a teacher leaves there are speeches, that we are all expected to attend, whole school collections & a huge fuss.
When a member of support staff leaves, there's a collection in their department only because, " no one will know them around the school", and you're lucky if you get a quick 2 minute speech.

GRRRRR:mad:
 
I had a conversation last week with one of our lady physicists who happens to have a doctorate so is Dr not Miss by title anyway within the school about how much she dislikes the term Miss. The practice dates back to the early 20th century when marriage bars prevented married women from having a career in education so the only women working in schools were unmarried and hence 'Miss'. Once a woman married they were expected to resign and give up their career to become a homemaker, this law was only finally abandoned in 1944 in education (and was still happening in other jobs as late as the 1970s!) Male school staff could have a career in education whether married or unmarried and were given the respectful moniker 'Sir' to reflect this. The term Miss is not the female equivalent of Sir (that would be Ma'am) and directly links back to the marriage bar when female staff were never expected to have a career in education and it was just a stop gap while they awaited a man to marry them!

I thought it was interesting food for thought....! Definitely nicer to be called by your given name :)
 

karen b

COMMITTEE
My son called all his teachers either Sir or Miss. He wasn’t taught by either of the Dr E’s (both chemists)
 
Seeing what some of you have to put up with I think I am quite lucky
On all-school e-mails we fall under science staff.
I only get called Miss by staff from other departments who don't know my name , everyone else including the head refers to me as Miss ****** or my first name in private.
Students have to give us the same respect as teaching staff and I can dish out a detention if they don't.
We get included in all aspects of school life, training days, sports days etc
We are given the same send off as everyone else when one leaves, prezzie, cards, speeches and a good send off
Shame our pay doesn't reflect that.
 
I notice that here, the students tend to call all the female staff Miss, regardless of whether they're married or not. I think it is just the kids 'playing safe'?
 
When I was at school - some time ago admittedly :laughing: my Dad used to go nuts if we were told to call male teachers "sir" His reasoning was that they hadn't been knighted so they didn't warrant the title. I have to agree. Mr ***** should suffice. Being called Miss doesn't bother me despite being a Mrs. It is at least polite which is more that we often get here and as KeithD says, it can be a case of the pupils just playing it safe.
 
I've been working in this school since September and my HoD seems to be unable to call me by my name. Initially I didn't think much of this as I was often referred to as 'miss'- especially in front of the students. However, as time has gone on I've noticed that everyone in the department is called by their name when not around students but this does not seem to be the case with me. I've also overheard her calling me 'that lab girl' to other members of staff.

I'm not very good at confrontation so I'm not sure how to deal with this, any suggestions are welcome.
Why not send all your department an email. Keep it light and short. Just say that you would like staff to call you by your first name rather than be called the technician (when there are no pupils around) as it makes you feel more part of the team. It is disrespectful of you HOY not to use your name but sometimes you can get what you want without making a big issue of it. They will take the hint.
 
Back in the day when I considered teaching (I think I hit my head then) I went to observe a year 7 science lesson in a state lesson. Bear in mind this was in September so students were still year 6s in some ways. The teacher was very senior, taught most of his life and came across as a well established gentleman. He kept referring to the students as "Sir" which I found odd, but they were very well behaved, so I didn't think too much of it. Maybe it made them feel more mature? Who knows...definitely unusual but if it works right?

Anywho, he did a practical in the lesson. It was about investigating surface area. It involved getting pieces of A4 paper and cutting different shapes, then holding such shapes with tongs and burning the piece of paper on a bunsen flame then timing how quickly it took to burn. The theory was that pieces with the larger surface area would burn quicker. The reality was different...

This was literally the worst practical in existence because no variable was controlled properly. Some kids shoved their shape burning it from the middle, others from the edges, some used a roaring flame, some safety, anyway the list goes on. Obviously, the results were non existent but this wasn't the biggest problem with the practical.

As I was going around the room, I noticed hesitation with quite a few students. I wasn't so sure why, surely young boys love to burn things? I had to encourage them and show them how to hold the piece of paper safely in the flame and hold it there until it completely burned.
Suddenly I felt something warm fly past behind me, I turned round and there it was a flying bit of burning paper casually whizzing across the room. Nonetheless, the students were well behaved despite the natural look of fear and remained relatively calm as the room started to light up with more bits of burning paper randomly floating.

I did indeed approach the teacher, voiced my concern (fear) and in his defense he was humble enough to admit it probably wasn't a good practical. He just got it straight from the book sort of thing and didn't try it.

As I left the room which was now covered in ash and half burnt remnants, I thanked the teacher for the experience and suddenly it hit me... I realized why the teacher called the boys Sir.

They all received a knighthood for bravery.
 
I had a conversation last week with one of our lady physicists who happens to have a doctorate so is Dr not Miss by title anyway within the school about how much she dislikes the term Miss. The practice dates back to the early 20th century when marriage bars prevented married women from having a career in education so the only women working in schools were unmarried and hence 'Miss'. Once a woman married they were expected to resign and give up their career to become a homemaker, this law was only finally abandoned in 1944 in education (and was still happening in other jobs as late as the 1970s!) Male school staff could have a career in education whether married or unmarried and were given the respectful moniker 'Sir' to reflect this. The term Miss is not the female equivalent of Sir (that would be Ma'am) and directly links back to the marriage bar when female staff were never expected to have a career in education and it was just a stop gap while they awaited a man to marry them!

I thought it was interesting food for thought....! Definitely nicer to be called by your given name :)
yep, my mum had to give up work at the local council in the early 60's when she got married. She could never understand why women today carry on working
 
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