Immobising lactase

Another query about a prac wanted by the same teacher, cannt find what milk i need to use, my instructions do not mention milk and unless you read method it is not mentioned just appears in a short sentence. Is it powdered milk as I have some in cupboard for some reason.
It seems so long since I did practicals, having trouble getting back into gear..
 
I'm assuming you're talking about immobilising lactase in sodium alginate, in which case semi skimmed bog standard milk will do for the milk (lactose) component.
 

Peter Sigsworth

COMMITTEE
Another query about a prac wanted by the same teacher, cannt find what milk i need to use, my instructions do not mention milk and unless you read method it is not mentioned just appears in a short sentence. Is it powdered milk as I have some in cupboard for some reason.
It seems so long since I did practicals, having trouble getting back into gear..
Don't forget some do different boards so you need to say exactly which practial you are talking about - use the prefix drop down to specify which board and type which level and which practical
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Hello Jan,
Would this method be helpful?
 

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I'm assuming you're talking about immobilising lactase in sodium alginate, in which case semi skimmed bog standard milk will do for the milk (lactose) component.
Yep, the sugars are the same in all milks they just skim off the cream.

can I use calcium chloride 2-water instead of 6-water or I have just calcium chloride

it's just to harden the alginate balls so you can adjust the amount.
 
It just advises not to use anhydrous calcium chloride.
How strange. I have always just used the tub of 'Calcium Chloride granules Anhydrous' made up to 1.5% Its never failed me yet - seems to harden up the alginate balls in an appropriate fashion.
 
How strange. I have always just used the tub of 'Calcium Chloride granules Anhydrous' made up to 1.5% Its never failed me yet - seems to harden up the alginate balls in an appropriate fashion.
I don't see how it will make a difference, the solution might get a little warmer.
 
I'm only stating what CLEAPSS states for making alginate beads. I don't know the reason behind it. If it works, don't mess with it.
yeah Recipe 19 says

Do not use anhydrous calcium chloride to make solutions; the reaction with water is highly exothermic and, in some cases, the water may boil. Use only distilled or deionised water to make solutions. In hard water areas, solutions may be cloudy if tap water is used.
 
yeah Recipe 19 says
Gosh - that's me told! I mean I'm aware that its exothermic and obviously always add the calcium chloride to the water and stir to distribute the heat, but didn't realise that I shouldn't be using it. I shall head over to the CLEAPSS website right now. Oops!
 
Okay, stupid question, but what does one use Calcium Chloride Anhydrous for? Clearly now that I know I shouldn't be using the anhydrous version, I'll get the correct sort in, but am wondering whether to keep or dispose of the anhydrous.
 

CovTech

Lvl 37 Alchemist
COMMITTEE
Flame tests would be the obvious candidate
Theres also one of the edexcel A-level Chem pracs which needs powdered dried calcium chloride
Always busting out the pestle and mortar and the oven
 
Okay, stupid question, but what does one use Calcium Chloride Anhydrous for? Clearly now that I know I shouldn't be using the anhydrous version, I'll get the correct sort in, but am wondering whether to keep or dispose of the anhydrous.
drying gases and maybe choice chambers instead of silica gel
 
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