How to keep my exit interview professional

Never heard of them before for support staff, but they have happened for teachers. I guess it depends who it is with and what they ask you, it is somewhat of a concern that the school management is trying to find out what went wrong at the point of you leaving. If you are asked a direct question I'd give a direct answer in as civil a manner as possible depending on the circumstances, if it is a rubber stamping exercise I'd be inclined to refuse to attend, if this is not an option and you feel uncomfortable with the situation just get up and leave.
 
If it is possible to rework what you want to say (maybe brain dump in notes somewhere?) into constructive feedback? i.e. not "they were rude and dismissive towards me" but "more support would have made my job more enjoyable", etc. I know when I leave my job next half term, there's a few small things I'll pass on to HOD about my co-worker, but in a positive (i.e. extra training) kind of way, rather than what I actually think... Things don't get better if they're ignored. Definitely plan it though!
Thats a great way to phrase it thanks!
 
Never heard of them before for support staff, but they have happened for teachers. I guess it depends who it is with and what they ask you, it is somewhat of a concern that the school management is trying to find out what went wrong at the point of you leaving. If you are asked a direct question I'd give a direct answer in as civil a manner as possible depending on the circumstances, if it is a rubber stamping exercise I'd be inclined to refuse to attend, if this is not an option and you feel uncomfortable with the situation just get up and leave.
Do you think it's concerning? :shocked: I thought it might just be a formality... though it is with the head ('department SLT link')

I already said I'd go because I intended on being honsest, but I don't hink I'm capable of being polite/constructive about it
 
I had one when I left my last school, with the HR manager, and I tried very hard to be professional but at the same time to be very honest about why I was leaving. Don't let it turn into a whinge session or go off on a rant, but also I don't think you should sugar coat it. If there are issues then they need to know or your replacement will probably be having their exit interview before too long!
 
They do them here, for both Teachers and associate staff. With HR, as others have said I think its purely a tick box exercise. Although I think our previous chemistry tech (who was retiring) and teachers that have left have been quite honest!
 
I'm leaving my current school tomorrow for a new one after half term. I have only now just been asked to attend an exit interview tomorrow (lol - great example of why I'm leaving).

How do I keep it civil while still being honest? Want good references in future, as tempting as it is to roast them to shit.

My grievances are largely with awful HoD line management. Bad morale (in part to the bad/non-existent management), feeling like I'm treated with little respect/not part of the so called 'team'. No appreciation of what and how much we do. The three times I asked for help, I was dismissed/told off for asking/had eyes rolled at me/told it's not their job. etc etc

I can elaborate further if people would like.

Or do I just smile and say a half truth - the new school is simply paying 25% more for the same role...
be honest they cant fix the problem if they aren't aware. you are leaving so wont have to see them again. as long as you aren't rude here is no issue as long as it is the truth.
 
Do you think it's concerning? :shocked: I thought it might just be a formality... though it is with the head ('department SLT link')

I already said I'd go because I intended on being honsest, but I don't hink I'm capable of being polite/constructive about it
Start by asking them what do they want to get out of the exit interview??? They invited you so they must have a reason. You can use that to gauge whether to be completely honest or not. Hopefully they will say that they want to know the reasons for you leaving and what they could do to improve things in the future - that is what they should be doing it for anyway!!!!
 
Never heard of them before for support staff, but they have happened for teachers. I guess it depends who it is with and what they ask you, it is somewhat of a concern that the school management is trying to find out what went wrong at the point of you leaving. If you are asked a direct question I'd give a direct answer in as civil a manner as possible depending on the circumstances, if it is a rubber stamping exercise I'd be inclined to refuse to attend, if this is not an option and you feel uncomfortable with the situation just get up and leave.
I had one when I left my job in a supermarket over twenty years ago to come to my current job. I told my boss that I was very grateful to him because he was so difficult to work for, that he had finally made my mind up for me about leaving. He just wrote it down like I was reading him a shopping list. I expect much the same at the one I shall shortly have here. I have refused to have one until I get the pension estimate I asked for six weeks ago.
 
My school do exit interviews for all staff. They with one of the governors or a member of SLT. The last tech that left was brutally honest about things and that did actually come back in our favour as a couple of the points she raised got dealt with in a way that was positive for us.
Personally I'd say be honest. You'll feel better getting it off your chest before you go and can start your new role with a clear head. You can sing the praises of those that deserve it and be honest about the less positive stuff. It may not make any difference, but I don't think it'll do any harm.
 
Ooooh! The whole idea of a 'exit interview' has touched a nerve - is the idea of these, to justify why you are leaving? - it feels like you are having to justify your actions. It seems typically arrogant of them of them to do this.:mad:. It feels like another consequence of a soulless business attitude infesting academia.
I've probably missed the point, but hey-ho good to have a whinge.
 
If there is a lot of resentment I think maybe the best thing is to actually refuse to do it. If they ask why just say you don't feel comfortable with it. They can't force you to do it.
I'd agree with that. There's not much they can do if you respectfully refuse to attend. Either that or turn up but don't engage beyond the essential interactions to avoid being accused of rudeness.

It's like here, anyone leaving after any sort of reasonable amount of time is expected to give a speech at the end of term meeting. This causes a long of anxiety for many people, and people often talk about trying to time their departure so as to avoid it corresponding with such a meeting. I've never understood that - you are leaving, your new job is presumably already in the bag by that point, so why not simply just walk out before the meeting? What can they do? One thing I'll say for certain, when my time comes to leave here, I certainly won't be giving any speeches!!
 
Do you think it's concerning? :shocked: I thought it might just be a formality... though it is with the head ('department SLT link')

I already said I'd go because I intended on being honsest, but I don't hink I'm capable of being polite/constructive about it
Be honest about that then - walk in say hi, ask how honest they would like it, as you are really struggling with professionalism as the amount of stress and other things has pushed you beyond reasonable measures and would very much prefer to walk away. and leave the ball in their court.
I know my school actually follow up on exit interview information - we had a entire new focus group formed from a few exit interviews containing similar information. So by going you stand a chance of improving the lot of the next person.
 
When I was leaving Morrisons I had an exit interview as they wanted to keep me - they offered me supervisor on grocery. Now supervisor gets the s**t from below and the s**t from managers, plus, Id never, ever in 7 years been on grocery. So I politely turned it down. To be told that it was 46 hours salaried. She thought that was a selling point! At that I lost it. I told her that where I was going was 37 hours salaried and did I look stupid. Needless to say the interview ended abruptly.
 
Ooooh! The whole idea of a 'exit interview' has touched a nerve - is the idea of these, to justify why you are leaving? - it feels like you are having to justify your actions. It seems typically arrogant of them of them to do this.:mad:. It feels like another consequence of a soulless business attitude infesting academia.
I've probably missed the point, but hey-ho good to have a whinge.
From my past exit interviews, they are typically to see if there is anything they can improve to keep staff there longer.
 
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