Highly concantrated Hydrochloric Acid stored with Ammonia

Greetings to everyone,

Having stored Ammonia with very concentrated Hydrochloric Acid gave some ammonium chloride as always,

Ammonium chloride isn't a dangerous salt, nevertheless my queries here are:

  1. How do I absorb the amount of ammonium chloride that has fallen on the floor?
  2. Because of some issues in our chemical supplying system I have bought 6L of very concentrated hydrochloric acid (36%) in order to always have raw material for preparing solutions for practical and demos. Is this something that should be avoided in the future and why? Would you suggest me to arrange a prompt removal with a hazardous waste contractor? And if yes which is the maximum amount of 36% Hydrochloric Acid that I should have in the chemical store?

Regards
 
Sweep up carefully avoiding raising dust or you could dampen it and use mineral absorbent.

As for stock I would go with annual usage plus 50%. There is no need to purchase any more than that realistically.
 
I also (with cleapss permission) store strong acids in same cupboard as ammonia. I do however, store them in separate deep trays- also makes taking out of cabinet, and cleaning spillage much easier, as can swap trays for clean ones, and fill to dilute and clean separately.
 
Try putting your physical bottles in large zip--lock bags or similar. Worked well to reduce the amount of ammonium chloride formed here. As for the mop up, damp (not wet) paper towels and try not to raise any dust.
 
We don't have any storage cupboards in our chem store other than a large flammables cupboard. Our acids are stored in extra deep Gratnell trays with lids, and the ammonia is stored in a separate lidded tray at the opposite end of the store . We used to have a heavy build up of Ammonium Chloride as our ventilation system was not functioning properly, the ventilation is now much improved and there is little to no build up. I believe Ammonium Chloride build up is a good early indicator of a poorly ventilated chem store.
 
We don't have any storage cupboards in our chem store other than a large flammables cupboard. Our acids are stored in extra deep Gratnell trays with lids, and the ammonia is stored in a separate lidded tray at the opposite end of the store . We used to have a heavy build up of Ammonium Chloride as our ventilation system was not functioning properly, the ventilation is now much improved and there is little to no build up. I believe Ammonium Chloride build up is a good early indicator of a poorly ventilated chem store.
our chem store is tested along with the fume cupboards as they are both LEV.
 
Our conc HCl is 'leaking' according to my head of department. Is it forming Ammonium Chloride?
 

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Looks like it, LM. Some containers are less airtight than others (hence why some put their bottles in bags to allow them to contain the fumes) and so the MacGuyver effect happens, if you remember an old TV program about a technician troublefixer... The effect also has uses as its uses in a diffusion demo with HCl and NH4 soaked cotton either end of a glass tube with a piece of string threaded through universal indicator paper. The gasses travel from their respective ends, changing the paper colour and making an ammonium chloride ring in the middle. Loads of other versions using different reactions available, but that's the one we're asked for at the moment.

On a larger scale, we have nice glass cabinets in each lab. When I first arrived, my predecessor left some HCl and Ammonia locked in one of them - it had turned white by the time I arrived.
 
Looks like it, LM. Some containers are less airtight than others (hence why some put their bottles in bags to allow them to contain the fumes) and so the MacGuyver effect happens, if you remember an old TV program about a technician troublefixer... The effect also has uses as its uses in a diffusion demo with HCl and NH4 soaked cotton either end of a glass tube with a piece of string threaded through universal indicator paper. The gasses travel from their respective ends, changing the paper colour and making an ammonium chloride ring in the middle. Loads of other versions using different reactions available, but that's the one we're asked for at the moment.

On a larger scale, we have nice glass cabinets in each lab. When I first arrived, my predecessor left some HCl and Ammonia locked in one of them - it had turned white by the time I arrived.
Thanks! Appreciate the response.
I've contained the HCl in a sealed ziplock bag until it can be properly disposed of. Sadly we don't have the space to store the chemicals separately.
 
Sweep up carefully avoiding raising dust or you could dampen it and use mineral absorbent.

As for stock I would go with annual usage plus 50%. There is no need to purchase any more than that realistically.

And then put in a self sealed bag and bin it?
 
6l of conc HCl isnt excessive, certainly don't dispose of it. Disposal charges are horrendous !
Im sure it will be used quite quickly, make up some stocks of weaker HCl if you want to reduce the amount of conc.
I always have 2-3 winchesters of conc at any one time :)
 
Sweep up carefully avoiding raising dust or you could dampen it and use mineral absorbent.

As for stock I would go with annual usage plus 50%. There is no need to purchase any more than that realistically.

Could you suggest me a kind of miner absorbent I could use? I don't have cat litter now
 
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