Good gas examples for a non-lab?

Teacher requesting some solids, liquids and gases to show some year 7's.

It's in a non-lab and I am struggling to think (maybe because its Friday!) of any good examples of gases that I could deliver.

I mean one could show CO2 through limewater but I believe doing this test isn't advised at this time.

It would be great if we had some canisters of gases such as the noble ones, or a means to fill up balloons to show different gases this way.

I could just fake chlorine gas by colouring the tubing slightly and attaching warning labels...

Any ideas?
 
You could pop down to a local party shop and get a balloon of Helium, you can blow up a balloon by breath and call it CO2, showing it is heavier than the Helium one.
that might work.
 
All fakes!
For year 7, I do chlorine and bromine by colouring the glass (swirling a nice viscous fluorescent yellow/brown ink respectively around the tube and draining upside down works pretty well). Then I have a few clear gas tubes too labelled as colourless gases (hydrogen, oxygen, etc.) but with air in them.
All bunged and with the bung taped over to keep it in- looks legit!
 
You could pop down to a local party shop and get a balloon of Helium, you can blow up a balloon by breath and call it CO2, showing it is heavier than the Helium one.
that might work.
Suggesting we use plague-bubbles in the time of COVID, Martin? :p Surely not.
 
But your breath sealed in the balloon., can then be disposed of in the prep room.
Eh, we've blanket-banned balloons >> can't trust the little dears not to pop them. Or that they won't pop accidentally during the demo and spew virusy droplets in all directions like a tiny pestilent grenade.
 
Eh, we've blanket-banned balloons >> can't trust the little dears not to pop them. Or that they won't pop accidentally during the demo and spew virusy droplets in all directions like a tiny pestilent grenade.
I suppose you could generate carbon dioxide and partially fill the balloon that way. I am doing that for hydrogen for a lunch time science club next week. I can just about half fill the balloon that way, it only just about floats.
 
I suppose you could generate carbon dioxide and partially fill the balloon that way. I am doing that for hydrogen for a lunch time science club next week. I can just about half fill the balloon that way, it only just about floats.
or use a CO2 cylinder if you have one.
 
Look at this thread
for ideas to generate gass filled balloons
 
You could fill balloons with the other gases as follws:- O2 (using H2O2 and Manganese IV oxide) and CO2 (using acid and marble chips) - or soda stream
 
Surely if you want to discuss solid liquid and gas it is safe and easy in a non lab. The chairs they sit on are solid, the air they breathe is gas, and the water they bring to school with them is liquid.

Great response! It's one of those topics that does not need a practical because students literally live in one. In my view, going all out with coloured gases, syringes filled with stuff and other equipment just adds complexity to something so simple.
 
Surely if you want to discuss solid liquid and gas it is safe and easy in a non lab. The chairs they sit on are solid, the air they breathe is gas, and the water they bring to school with them is liquid.
Great response! It's one of those topics that does not need a practical because students literally live in one. In my view, going all out with coloured gases, syringes filled with stuff and other equipment just adds complexity to something so simple.
Agreed - but making things more exiting by showing real tangible unusual things makes it stick in the memory better - otherwise we should stop all practicals and just show videos.
No need for techs anymore!:serious: :serious:
 
Agreed - but making things more exiting by showing real tangible unusual things makes it stick in the memory better - otherwise we should stop all practicals and just show videos.
No need for techs anymore!:serious:

I get what you're saying, but not everything requires a practical or signing/dancing is my point. Nick's idea can be just as exciting as a practical if done right, just requires some showmanship/drama/imagination on the teacher's part to expand on it instead of just simply pointing out the chair is a solid, end of lesson....

Now, if you just want to provide something for the sake of justifying our jobs then that's a different topic altogether ;)
 
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All fakes!
For year 7, I do chlorine and bromine by colouring the glass (swirling a nice viscous fluorescent yellow/brown ink respectively around the tube and draining upside down works pretty well). Then I have a few clear gas tubes too labelled as colourless gases (hydrogen, oxygen, etc.) but with air in them.
All bunged and with the bung taped over to keep it in- looks legit!
What could one use to make it a bit more viscous? I have gelatine I am thinking of using :)
 
Don't see why you're getting defensive? I was specifically talking about a particular lesson. Not everything has to be signing and dancing as that can actually be counterproductive in some ways. I can give a specific example. Teacher was doing a lesson on testing for gases, one of which was oxygen. She did the classic splint test but also decided to do elephant's toothpaste. Next week students had an exam and the question specifically asked what the test for oxygen was, I'll leave it to your imagination what they wrote down.

Making things exciting and flashy is all well and good until that's all the students remember, then you have a problem. Nick's idea can be just as exciting as a practical if done right, just requires some showmanship/drama on the teacher's part to expand on it instead of just simply pointing out the chair is a solid, end of lesson....
Just making a point - the example you gave is more about the ability of the teacher selecting the most relevant practical not whether it is all si
What could one use to make it a bit more viscous? I have gelatine I am thinking of using :)
Chlorine is a heavy gas and bromine is a liquid which isn't partcualry viscous so gelatine would be a waste of time.
 
Just making a point - the example you gave is more about the ability of the teacher selecting the most relevant practical not whether it is all si

Chlorine is a heavy gas and bromine is a liquid which isn't partcualry viscous so gelatine would be a waste of time.
I mean, how are you staining the gas containers for this? Tried some brown colouring and swirled it around - we will see what happens.
 
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