Glass steam traps - which experiments used them?

Whatever it was, it must have been done as a class practical as I have about 30 of them in a drawer here (6th form college physics department). Not been asked for them in the 38 years that I've been here! I'll have a look in our old Nuffield A level books.
 
The only reference that I can find is to prevent water vapour being sucked into a vacuum pump, spoiling the oil. That would explain us having a couple, but not a drawer full.
 
what do they look like, the only thing I can find for 'steam traps' is on steam engines. (I have an retired chemistry tech I can ask)
 
Aah! I think I may have it thanks to my old 1960 Philip Harris catalogue. It looks like it is to prevent water droplets being carried through to the condenser by the steam when measuring latent heat of vaporization.
 
what do they look like, the only thing I can find for 'steam traps' is on steam engines. (I have an retired chemistry tech I can ask)
Hi Paul, if Mad Hatters are the same as mine then they are a glass bulb with a tube entering either end - one is straight, the other bent over inside the bulb at an angle. Similar to this


although the glass bulbs on mine are spherical rather than cylindrical.
 
steam trap is to discharge condensate, air and other incondensable gases from a steam system while not permitting the escape of live steam

Normally used in thermodynamics practical
 
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