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Do you think a degree is importent to be a science techician?

Do you think a degree is importent to being a science techician?

  • Yes

    Votes: 2 3.0%
  • No

    Votes: 64 97.0%

  • Total voters
    66
I see a lot a techs who have one I am just curious to how Important people thing it is.
 
Last edited:

clairelucas

COMMITTEE
Important or impotent? Both equally valid suggestions... Freudian slip maybe? Might be more to do with people taking the positions. Its not universal, but there will be a few like me, who have qualifications pre-family, but take on the role to fit in with childcare...
Science qualification background and common sense is important. Whatever degree you have, it isn't likely to cover all 3 sciences, so we can't be qualified to degree level on the subjects we're teching for...
 
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Nope. As someone who has a science degree and started as a lone technician, I can say in my experience what got me through was my organisation, being pro-active and flexible. With few niche exceptions, I cannot recall moments where I thought "It's only thanks to my degree that I was able to achieve this".
Whilst having a science background is definitely advantageous to softening the entry barrier, anyone can learn on the job if they have the right qualities and proper support.
 
I have a degree but I don't think it's the most important thing. It does help that I have a good knowledge of science though.
 

Julie Delaney

COMMITTEE
I see a lot a techs who have one I am just curious to how Important people thing it is.
I came through industry and cut my teeth there. To be honest, if I had a degree I would want t hell of a lot more than the 15k I earn doing this job. I did start one with the OU but had to give it up due to my parents becoming very ill. when I went to go back to it, the fees had become astronomical and so, I never went back. I now have half a degree!! :(:eek::D
 
I'm a Physics tech, I have an OND in Technology, the equivalent of 'A' level (circa 1978) and couldn't manage without that knowledge. Although some of the stuff I learned at 'O' Level is now on the 'A' level spec.
I did 2 years of a degree in Electrical and Electronic Eng (before getting a Summer job and not going back) So I can run rings around my dept.
For me the most important thing is to have a thirst for knowledge in science, A degree may demonstrate that to your department, but wont help you be in three labs at once.
T
 

Techitude

COMMITTEE
No a degree is not necessary. I have a BSc but being a good technician is more to do with common sense and an ability to work flexibly and efficiently. Science knowledge and practicals can be learnt on the job to the relevant level.
I would rather have someone without a degree who is switched on and motivated than someone with one who flounders.
 
I'm a Physics tech, I have an OND in Technology, the equivalent of 'A' level (circa 1978) and couldn't manage without that knowledge. Although some of the stuff I learned at 'O' Level is now on the 'A' level spec.
I did 2 years of a degree in Electrical and Electronic Eng (before getting a Summer job and not going back) So I can run rings around my dept.
For me the most important thing is to have a thirst for knowledge in science, A degree may demonstrate that to your department, but wont help you be in three labs at once.
T

Yep OND BTEC in Science obtained in 1987 - covered a broad spectrum of Sciences [including Business studies as one unit - accountancy came in useful when hubby & daughter set up own businesses] I did a YTS in a Lab for 1yr and 12yrs at BT as an engineer. Agree re things I was taught at O'level now moved to A'level. In my previous job had a clearance of old unused equipment [that I remember using at O'level], which I donated to the college I work at now for their A'level spec.

Nope. As someone who has a science degree and started as a lone technician, I can say in my experience what got me through was my organisation, being pro-active and flexible. With few niche exceptions, I cannot recall moments where I thought "It's only thanks to my degree that I was able to achieve this".
Whilst having a science background is definitely advantageous to softening the entry barrier, anyone can learn on the job if they have the right qualities and proper support.

And agree with Emil common sense and knowing where to find answers greatest 'qualifications' you can have.
 
Never had one or want one.
Did a number of years in an industrial lab and now over 30 years experience (which can never be replaced) in education.
BTEC national certificate in Science, various O levels and loads of CLEAPSS and other institution training courses ranging from lab courses to management courses.
 
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Nope. As someone who has a science degree and started as a lone technician, I can say in my experience what got me through was my organisation, being pro-active and flexible. With few niche exceptions, I cannot recall moments where I thought "It's only thanks to my degree that I was able to achieve this".
Whilst having a science background is definitely advantageous to softening the entry barrier, anyone can learn on the job if they have the right qualities and proper support.
Like Emil I am a lone technician and agree with her that my organisation skills, being pro active and flexible have been more essential than my qualifications - Biology degree and PhD in Marine Biology. However my background in Biology is useful and I think I would have managed without the general science knowledge I gained from O and A level - although so long ago much of it was forgotten.
 
Never had one or want one.
Did a number of years in an industrial lab and now over 30 years experience (which can never be replaced) in education.
BTEC national certificate in Science, various O levels and loads of CLEAPSS and other institution training courses ranging from lab courses to management courses.

Likewise - worked in research and development then quality control for about 25 years before becoming a science tech. No science degree... in fact, I hated science at school! Working in education is less stressful, but of course it's also less money!
 
Likewise - worked in research and development then quality control for about 25 years before becoming a science tech. No science degree... in fact, I hated science at school! Working in education is less stressful, but of course it's also less money!
It just shows you how things can work out stelden - how paths can change in life.:);)
 
No, I don't feel a degree is necessary or important. I've been a techie for 7 years now and don't have a degree, I also don't have any type of science background so came into the role completely blind.
 
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