Distilled water or tap water for agar plates?

I'm making agar plates and realised the CLEAPSS recipe doesn't state to use distilled water for nutrient agar (unless I missed something) but it specifically says so for other types of agar. I always have used distilled, but does it matter what I use / can I use tap water?
 

ajmc98

Don't lick, smell or touch it and you won't die.
IMO Distilled or De-ionised, tap water has chlorine and fluorides in which might effect your cultures. Probably not a big issue for school use, but probably more at an industry level.
 
This is on my list of ''Things that are probably fine, but I wouldn't want to risk it because its such a pain to have to re-do it if it doesn't work'' haha.

Probably grand to use tap water but I personally wouldn't risk it going wrong.
 
This is on my list of ''Things that are probably fine, but I wouldn't want to risk it because its such a pain to have to re-do it if it doesn't work'' haha.

Probably grand to use tap water but I personally wouldn't risk it going wrong.
That's exactly how I feel, biology already has enough issues as it is :laughing:
IMO Distilled or De-ionised, tap water has chlorine and fluorides in which might effect your cultures. Probably not a big issue for school use, but probably more at an industry level.
Thank you both! Think I'll stick with the distilled just to be on the safe side
 
I'm making agar plates and realised the CLEAPSS recipe doesn't state to use distilled water for nutrient agar (unless I missed something) but it specifically says so for other types of agar. I always have used distilled, but does it matter what I use / can I use tap water?
Distilled.

The kitchen used to pH check the distilled water and media and also do a TDS on the distilled water when i worked in a microbiology lab
 
Have always used just Brummy tap water, we make ours in our autoclave and have never had an issue with it failing to culture. Have more problems with keeping our cultures going
 
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