ASE membership / registered technician status

Morning all. I am in the process of filling out the paperwork to apply for registered technician status. In order to do this it seems I also have to join the ASE. My main aim is to raise the profile of what I do in the school particularly amongst management.

I was just wondering if anyone else is a registered technician or is a member of ASE.
 

greenfingers

Sarah G
COMMITTEE
Hi I am a registered technician and have been since 2015,you have to be a member of an association to be a member.I joined the ASE as it was value for money at £30 a year plus there are lots of resources on their site plus discounts on their courses,you also have to pay each year to keep your registered status ,upkeep of CPD so keep a record of all courses research,and reading that you do.Hope this helps
 
Was a member many years ago. Went to several exhibitions from about 1993-1998. Also went to a couple of ASE technician events. Anyone remember the "tent" at Solihull College 1996? (showing my age) Even on a fledgling ASE West Midlands Technician committee from about 96-04. Left 2004/2005 as no longer felt it met my needs.
Me being cynical it had its ups and downs.
 
My senior tech is registered - the school refuse to pay for me to become registered, apparently the joining fee and then registration fee is too much for them to spare :( May end up paying for it myself
 
My senior tech is registered - the school refuse to pay for me to become registered, apparently the joining fee and then registration fee is too much for them to spare :( May end up paying for it myself
I'm really lucky that my school is willing to pay the joining and registration fee so I figured I'd do it before they changed their minds! I'm only joining ASE as I can't become registered without doing that!
 
I am a member of ASE (can claim tax back and boss appreciates the discount on great publications). Have tried to fill out registered technician form so many times but keep being asked to do stuff (you know like set up practicals, wash up etc).
 
Couldn't see the point of becoming a registered technician as the school wouldn't pay for the registrations and membership and it wouldn't raise my profile in the school, all it would do is empty my pockets!
 
I've been registered for a couple of years. As said above, you do need to be a member of one of the recognised associations. I was a member of the ASE anyway, but now school pays for that and the registration :) . I'm lucky in that respect. The membership isn't too expensive and it does attract discounts on ASE publications and conferences. We were strongly encouraged by our HoS to become registered as part of his drive to raise our profile and improve recognition of what we contribute. I subsequently made a successful case to management for us all to be moved up the pay scale (not far, but it was worthwhile). I think the RSciTech helped to strengthen the case, although it was't decisive. Day-to-day, it makes no difference to how I do my job. It would be useful in the unlikely event I apply for a technician role elsewhere.

Don't get too hung up on the forms. It's not quite as onerous as you might think. An experienced technician should have plenty to back up their application. The ASE Technicians' Committee are very helpful too if you have queries or concerns.
 
I'm really lucky that my school is willing to pay the joining and registration fee so I figured I'd do it before they changed their minds! I'm only joining ASE as I can't become registered without doing that!

From what I can see, the ASE membership is really useful - they have a lot of resources that I'd really like to look through and try work into our curriculum - but alas, the school say it doesn't benefit them! Don't quite see or understand why it doesn't benefit them for me to join and register, yet it does for my senior tech. I'd pay myself if I got a decent wage as it would really help my CV out so I can escape the hell I'm in now :confused::confused:
 
I am a member of ASE (can claim tax back and boss appreciates the discount on great publications). Have tried to fill out registered technician form so many times but keep being asked to do stuff (you know like set up practicals, wash up etc).
Haha - yes, I started filling out the form in September! I'm determined to get it finalised this month...
 
Considered this a few years ago. Cost wise I would be out of pocket and some of the requirements appeared (at the time) to be out of normal tech duties such as writing an article in a peer reviewed publication. None of us have it here just many years experience.
 
Few of us have published articles (I know I haven't!), but the fact that you're reading/contributing to this board is professional development. It all counts.
 
I was a member for several years some time ago and found it very useful, especially the discounted courses. The free publications were good too! I admit I paid for it myself as I felt it a useful addition to my CV and future career, and ,sometimes you have to take the initiative yourselves and do these things.
 
Hi. I have been registered (RSci) for a few years now as I applied when the new registers were first set up. Since I was already a member of the RSC, I applied for my membership through them. In June 2016 I undertook training by the RSC and joined their team of volunteer assessors who review the applications for RSciTech and RSci and have been doing this regularly since then.

Fortunately my school pay for my membership and fees which does help a lot given the expense I would otherwise have to cover out of my own pocket. I am pleased to hear that other people have been able to get their employers to cover the cost of this registration and membership of a professional body as well. It seems sensible really, as it benefits any employer to have engaged and professionally active staff and is quite common practice in other industries. Sadly, this is not the case for everyone and many schools budgets cannot stretch to cover the added expense of this. However, if you have considered applying for this but have been put off by the fees, I'd encourage you to try and speak to your line manager about the potential to get these costs covered by the school if you haven't already – it can’t hurt to try.

In terms of the benefits of registration, it may depend a lot on your school and the attitudes of the people that you work with. It will be unlikely to make a massive difference to your day to day work, but as others have already mentioned on this thread, it is a good way to demonstrate to management and other members of the school (as well as any prospective employers in the future) that you are a respected professional and provide evidence that you are undertaking valuable CPD activities to maintain this status.
 
Considered this a few years ago. Cost wise I would be out of pocket and some of the requirements appeared (at the time) to be out of normal tech duties such as writing an article in a peer reviewed publication. None of us have it here just many years experience.

Hi Casey. I can't specifically comment on how other bodies such as the ASE do things, but I assess RSciTech applications for the RSC and we all basically work to the same required competences.

In my experience none of the requirements for this are out the normal duties of an experienced science technician. I would not for instance be expecting someone who is applying from a school for RSciTech to have written a journal article, this would be more like the type of activities you may see on applicants applying from industry or academia for RSCi or for chartered status. If you have many years of experience then I'd imagine you already meet or exceed all of the required competences and should not be put off from applying.
 

Nick Mitchener

COMMITTEE
I have been a physics technician at an academy 11-18 for 6 years. I am a member of the ASE but I read the RSCiTech forms and it did not seem to apply to me. Seemed more suited to somebody working in research. I don't think I qualify. I do advise non specialists and helped produce new experiments for use in the new GCSE and GCE A levels but that doesn't sound like it fits the bill when you read the application.
 
I have enjoyed reading this thread and will definitely be considering joining the ASE and registering as an RSciTech, I can possibly get the school to pay for this as I have recently been promoted to, as the head teacher has named the role, lead science technician. I was told that the school would pay for CPD that may assist me in this role.

While doing some research I have seen the description of RSci
"For staff in scientific and senior technical roles – candidates will typically (but not exclusively) be qualified to at least QCF level 5 and will be applying this knowledge to their roles. It provides recognition in its own right but can also be a springboard to CSci status"
And was wondering if its possible to go for this registration instead as I do hold a Degree in biomedical science but I'm unsure if there is even any need for this. As its all new to me as of reading this thread I didn't even know it existed.
 

Nick Mitchener

COMMITTEE
I only have A levels, and no evidence of them as I took them nearly 45 years ago, QCF5 is a degree. I ran an engineering company for 21 years and have not had to produce a certificate for my education since I was in my teens.

In fact the only qualifications I have certificates in anything is as an able seaman, which isn't a lot of help!
 
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