Any Animals for sale

Nick Mitchener

COMMITTEE
If they do get a tortoise, and they really really shouldn't, remember it will be alive long after you have retired, and long after you and most of the teachers are dead. You need succession planning built into the care plan.
 
Tortoises are horribly impractical for schools. Baby ones can live in a viv but they'll soon needs tons of room and outside space (depending on the species). My bearded dragon is fine at school, she has a viv here and a viv at my house and i only live up the road. I take full responsibility for her. The kids love her, she is a real bonus to have i think but definitely not something to take on lightly.
 
We have various critters here which a previous Biology teacher acquired and took complete ownership of with regards to their care and feeding. Since he left they have slowly become my responsibility. Sadly I don't really have the time and knowledge to give them the care they deserve especially as the school has expanded in terms of pupil numbers and science teacher numbers and it's still just me as lone tech. They are expensive to look after in terms of heat lamps, uv lamps, mats timers etc that never seem last that long, as well as the food. Make sure you get some budget for the ongoing costs.

My favourite is the corn snake and if you really have to get something then this may be the best option as it is less demanding in terms of heat and light and can also be encouraged to hibernate over the Christmas holidays which is a big help.
 
We have various critters here which a previous Biology teacher acquired and took complete ownership of with regards to their care and feeding. Since he left they have slowly become my responsibility. Sadly I don't really have the time and knowledge to give them the care they deserve especially as the school has expanded in terms of pupil numbers and science teacher numbers and it's still just me as lone tech. They are expensive to look after in terms of heat lamps, uv lamps, mats timers etc that never seem last that long, as well as the food. Make sure you get some budget for the ongoing costs.

My favourite is the corn snake and if you really have to get something then this may be the best option as it is less demanding in terms of heat and light and can also be encouraged to hibernate over the Christmas holidays which is a big help.
I loved having corn snake for a few years. But got sick of having to always be the one cleaning him out, taking him home over summer etc.
I was main handler & all was fine, then out of the blue one day he bit me, blooming hurt, and bled a lot. I was a bit nervous after that, which he picked up on & bit me more.
 
I loved having corn snake for a few years. But got sick of having to always be the one cleaning him out, taking him home over summer etc.
I was main handler & all was fine, then out of the blue one day he bit me, blooming hurt, and bled a lot. I was a bit nervous after that, which he picked up on & bit me more.
That's sad :crying: Ours has bitten me once but he really didn't mean to and looked quite horrified (if a snake can look horrified!) It was my fault for opening the door too wide when feeding him so he launched himself at the mouse but ended up hanging out of the vivarium and dropped the mouse, then went to grab it again at the place where it had been a second earlier - my hand!

All our animals stay in school and I make a feeding rota for them over the holidays which the teachers try to avoid adding their names to, because they get paid in the holidays and I don't :rolleyes: And they quite often forget to also top up the water.......... and we let these people teach our children.......
 
That's sad :crying: Ours has bitten me once but he really didn't mean to and looked quite horrified (if a snake can look horrified!) It was my fault for opening the door too wide when feeding him so he launched himself at the mouse but ended up hanging out of the vivarium and dropped the mouse, then went to grab it again at the place where it had been a second earlier - my hand!

All our animals stay in school and I make a feeding rota for them over the holidays which the teachers try to avoid adding their names to, because they get paid in the holidays and I don't :rolleyes: And they quite often forget to also top up the water.......... and we let these people teach our children.......

I think the snake was more worried about being turned into an accessory :vampire:
 

Nick Mitchener

COMMITTEE
Tatty our tortoise has bitten toes occasionally to investigate, we are wary now. He ignores feet now though if he knows the owner, I think initially he hadn't worked out they were part of us. Must all look odd down there. He will occasionally do a warning mouth opening at you but no real attempt to bite. If feeding him by hand you have to be careful as he tends to lunge at his food.
 
I'm sure SLT go though lists of courses and think... 'Yeah, that sounds a good idea,' while in practice there's never any thought about what is needed, or, in the case of animals, who would look after everything during weekends and holidays. I made a point of saying it wouldn't be me...
So, we do animal science... with no animals... unless you count some of the students :rolleyes:
 
We lost the corn snake for whole of summer holiday in our house once, that was fun :rolleyes:
My son had a 3 ft corn snake and we lost it in our house too, it escaped the tank in his bedroom upstairs. I put lines of flour across doorways to try and detect it as it would leave a trail if passed through. I told the neighbours (semi detached) in case it made its way next door. They weren't very happy! Anyway 4 weeks later I was sitting on the loo downstairs and out of the corner of my eye I saw it slithering along beside the bath........so pants around ankles I slowly grabbed a towel........then launched myself at it and grabbed it! Then I had to pull up my undercrackers whilst holding the snake before I could leave the bathroom. Never imagined that scenario when I had kids :)
 
It had made its way downstairs! The thought of it going down the stairs versus somehow getting through pipework maybe - equally unsettling!
 
Have there been any thoughts about the space needed for these? Both dragons and hedgehogs need a 4ft long by 2ft tank at a minimum, tortioses appreciate more space and all those animals require precise heating and uvb. They will be pricey to set up.

Comitting to an exotic animal requires a lot of research beforehand, where will you keep the live food? Where will you keep the supliments? Where will you keep your hibernating tortoises if the species you decide needs hibernating? Do you know which exact species of tortoise you want?

I think these needs more planning in your department.
How do you know how much planning we have done? We have another site with a large animal section and an experienced animal handler sp i think we will be OK.
 

Nick Mitchener

COMMITTEE
How do you know how much planning we have done? We have another site with a large animal section and an experienced animal handler sp i think we will be OK.

Well if you are considering tortoises not a lot I would think. Have you got a 70-100 year plan for animal care? Are you expecting them to be handled?
 
My son had a 3 ft corn snake and we lost it in our house too, it escaped the tank in his bedroom upstairs. I put lines of flour across doorways to try and detect it as it would leave a trail if passed through. I told the neighbours (semi detached) in case it made its way next door. They weren't very happy! Anyway 4 weeks later I was sitting on the loo downstairs and out of the corner of my eye I saw it slithering along beside the bath........so pants around ankles I slowly grabbed a towel........then launched myself at it and grabbed it! Then I had to pull up my undercrackers whilst holding the snake before I could leave the bathroom. Never imagined that scenario when I had kids :)
LOL.
 
We have various critters here which a previous Biology teacher acquired and took complete ownership of with regards to their care and feeding. Since he left they have slowly become my responsibility. Sadly I don't really have the time and knowledge to give them the care they deserve especially as the school has expanded in terms of pupil numbers and science teacher numbers and it's still just me as lone tech. They are expensive to look after in terms of heat lamps, uv lamps, mats timers etc that never seem last that long, as well as the food. Make sure you get some budget for the ongoing costs.

My favourite is the corn snake and if you really have to get something then this may be the best option as it is less demanding in terms of heat and light and can also be encouraged to hibernate over the Christmas holidays which is a big help.
Thanks.
 
Tortoises are horribly impractical for schools. Baby ones can live in a viv but they'll soon needs tons of room and outside space (depending on the species). My bearded dragon is fine at school, she has a viv here and a viv at my house and i only live up the road. I take full responsibility for her. The kids love her, she is a real bonus to have i think but definitely not something to take on lightly.
Thanks
 
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