Pressure cooker testing

Hey guys,

Who do you get in to test your pressure cookers?

I have 1 that needs testing so I would like to get some quotes on this or to see if its cheaper to buy a new one each year :D
 
New ones don't need testing, you just need to know that the WSE exists and what the interval before testing is, cleapss specifically say that you can buy a prestige 6l High dome pressure cooker and use it for 12 months without testing.
This
We have them as a annual consumable resource, not environmentally friendly I know but all out HoD was willing to commit to
 
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1 <3 Daphnia

Guest
The easiest way to do it is to go on the CLEAPSS - pressure systems course and then you can obtain a WSE for £10 I believe and test it in house for free, that's what we do here. :)
 
try mandatesystems.com

We do WSE's and I've recently become aware that schools were encountering these problems with respect to PSSR. We have an online system that will produce the WSE once we've put in the relevant details, and you can then either leave it on our server and access it as required or download and print.

I would be grateful if you could send through the make, model, serial number, purchase date and a number of photographs to identify the items and I can produce the WSE on your behalf, signed by myself as the Competent Person. For schools only we're charging £25 + VAT per item.

The photographs serve 2 purposes, to identify the exact item and as a reference to you in future to act as a benchmark for your examination. If you could ensure the photos include the safety valve and pressure gauge (if fitted), I can make sure the WSE features these.

Once the WSE is produced you will carry out the annual examination in accordance with the WSE, send the results to us and we re-issue the WSE with an exam report. The charge for this is also £25 + VAT per item.
 
This
We have them as a annual consumable resource, not environmentally friendly I know but all out HoD was willing to commit to
It's environmentally friendly if you give the barely used ones away to staff who could use them to cook stuff for a shorter time using less fuel............
 
It's environmentally friendly if you give the barely used ones away to staff who could use them to cook stuff for a shorter time using less fuel............
If we go down that route we might look at saying anyone can purchase it off the science department for a token fee to go towards the new one. Probably the cost of the new one less how much it would cost to pressure test it.
 

Janeylou

Madbird
Hey guys,

Who do you get in to test your pressure cookers?

I have 1 that needs testing so I would like to get some quotes on this or to see if its cheaper to buy a new one each year :D
Have just been on a course with CLEAPPS for pressure vessels. "Examining Autoclaves, pressure cookers and model steam engines. Well worth the day out. If you are a member of CLEAPPS it costs around £130 if I remember correct. You get practical hands on time with various items as well as the legal side of testing. Pretty much what a load of other peeps have suggested.
My recommendation for testers/validation would be LmP Technical services as they can sort out some things via mail and photographs. They are on www.LmP.co.uk and examine all makes of autoclaves, pressure cookers and model steam engines including Prestige Medical automatic autoclaves. Also certification of WSE for autoclaves, pressure cookers and model steam engines.
 
Sorry to open up an older thread but I'm curious how everyone is getting on with this legislation, regarding their pressure vessels?

Are you buying new Steam engines/cookers/autoclaves, or doing the course and getting the WSE certified by an engineer?

I'm presuming everyone is doing whichever is cheapest...
 
Sorry to open up an older thread but I'm curious how everyone is getting on with this legislation, regarding their pressure vessels?

Are you buying new Steam engines/cookers/autoclaves, or doing the course and getting the WSE certified by an engineer?

I'm presuming everyone is doing whichever is cheapest...
i'm not using the Steam engines/autoclaves.
 
Sorry to open up an older thread but I'm curious how everyone is getting on with this legislation, regarding their pressure vessels?

Are you buying new Steam engines/cookers/autoclaves, or doing the course and getting the WSE certified by an engineer?

I'm presuming everyone is doing whichever is cheapest...
We got the quotes and found that (at least locally) to get that initial engineer in to ratify the WSE and then refresh it every couple of years would cost more than a new pressure cooker every year which is covered for 12 months by manufacturers warranty

It was something like £40 a year for a new one vs £250 for a 3 year WSE if I remember, so double the effective cost, either way the HoD at the time said new one every year it is.....
 
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