How do First Aiders do their job with Covid-19regulations?

Covid-19: advice for first aiders


As per cleapss for IRM
Good advice Paul. However like many of the CLEAPPS Directives may not be practical Stay safe Paul. For example last year I was called to attend a member of staff who was foaming at the mouth and had his head in his dinner plate and showed signs of paralysis on one side of his face-he was having Stroke.
 

karen b

COMMITTEE
Good advice Paul. However like many of the CLEAPPS Directives may not be practical Stay safe Paul. For example last year I was called to attend a member of staff who was foaming at the mouth and had his head in his dinner plate and showed signs of paralysis on one side of his face-he was having Stroke.
Have you actually read the advice or are you just slagging off cleapps as per usual?

I don't see how your story of a someone having a stroke relates is relevant
 
Have you actually read the advice or are you just slagging off cleapps as per usual?

I don't see how your story of a someone having a stroke relates is relevant
In these strange and uncertain days it would be nice if everyone was nice to each other Karen. However I do see your point.
 
Doesn't change how first aid works, first rule of first aid, assess the risks and don't put yourself in danger. If you think there's a danger from covid, you don't help them, simple. Just call and ambulance.
But before the Paramedics arrive what do you do? I don't have a fase mask but I'm entrusted in keeping the patient alive until help comes. What about the first stages-Airways open etc?
 
But before the Paramedics arrive what do you do? I don't have a fase mask but I'm entrusted in keeping the patient alive until help comes. What about the first stages-Airways open etc?
You risk assess the situation and if you deem it's not safe you do nothing, other than tell the emergency service the details as best you can, telling them what you think has happened and the current situation of the the patient as best you can tell without putting yourself in danger. There's no onus on you to actually do anything, you're a first aider, not a paramedic/doctor. Every first aid course I've ever been on, the instructor has said if you feel you're going to put yourself in danger, don't get involved because then you end up with two dead people.
 
The generic instruction about prioritising your own safety clearly relates to situations (like dealing with a casualty still connected to a power supply, or drowning) where the risk of injury or death is demonstrably high. We are faced with a much more subtle situation, these days. I think it's unlikely that we will be going back to work without compulsory facemasks; it's certainly something I will be pushing for very hard. This will help in a large number of situations. If your institution decides to open with them, they should at least be supplied to first aiders.

For those where much more intimate contact is required, like resuscitation, you could invest a small amount of your first aid honorarium in one of these: https://www.amazon.co.uk/HypaGuard-Pocket-Face-Mask-Resuscitation/dp/B004DPFA7G/ref=sr_1_3 If you're feeling flush, you could even go for the Laerdahl one, which is just over twice the price. There are plenty of online guides as to their use. For dealing with blood and other bodily fluids, you should already have access to gloves and the relevant training as to how to reduce the possibilty of cross-infection. It should be a pre-requisite of reopening that supplies of first-aid gloves should be replenished if they have disappeared during lockdown.
 
for CPR,

Because of the heightened awareness of the possibility that the victim may have COVID-19, Resuscitation Council UK offers this advice:

  • Recognise cardiac arrest by looking for the absence of signs of life and the absence of normal breathing. Do not listen or feel for breathing by placing your ear and cheek close to the patient’s mouth. If you are in any doubt about confirming cardiac arrest, the default position is to start chest compressions until help arrives.
  • Make sure an ambulance is on its way. If COVID 19 is suspected, tell them when you call 999.
  • If there is a perceived risk of infection, rescuers should place a cloth/towel over the victims mouth and nose and attempt compression only CPR and early defibrillation until the ambulance (or advanced care team) arrives. Put hands together in the middle of the chest and push hard and fast.
  • Early use of a defibrillator significantly increases the person’s chances of survival and does not increase risk of infection.
  • If the rescuer has access to any form of personal protective equipment (PPE) this should be worn.
  • After performing compression-only CPR, all rescuers should wash their hands thoroughly with soap and water; alcohol-based hand gel is a convenient alternative. They should also seek advice from the NHS 111 coronavirus advice service or medical adviser.
 

karen b

COMMITTEE
The generic instruction about prioritising your own safety clearly relates to situations (like dealing with a casualty still connected to a power supply, or drowning) where the risk of injury or death is demonstrably high. We are faced with a much more subtle situation, these days. I think it's unlikely that we will be going back to work without compulsory facemasks; it's certainly something I will be pushing for very hard. This will help in a large number of situations. If your institution decides to open with them, they should at least be supplied to first aiders.

For those where much more intimate contact is required, like resuscitation, you could invest a small amount of your first aid honorarium in one of these: https://www.amazon.co.uk/HypaGuard-Pocket-Face-Mask-Resuscitation/dp/B004DPFA7G/ref=sr_1_3 If you're feeling flush, you could even go for the Laerdahl one, which is just over twice the price. There are plenty of online guides as to their use. For dealing with blood and other bodily fluids, you should already have access to gloves and the relevant training as to how to reduce the possibilty of cross-infection. It should be a pre-requisite of reopening that supplies of first-aid gloves should be replenished if they have disappeared during lockdown.
I was going to ask what one of these is, but I know as I had one with a previous job. Must see if we get one now
 
The problem with the CPR advice for us is that young people, generally, don't have cardiac arrest they have respiratory arrest which then leads to cardiac arrest. If you can get the breathing going, the heart issues are avoided. Just chest compressions _may_ help but nobody is sure.
 
I'm afraid rat whether we like it or not we do have resonspibities Paul.
only when it is safe not for political reasons.
In line with Government advice, everyone who can work from home should continue to do so. Please continue to avoid public transport, where possible, to free up the limited space available to those who have no alternative way to travel.
 
Hubby was a first aider when he was at work and has said the first thing they were always told by the instructor was the most important person involved is the first aider themself and they must put their safety above all others.
 
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