Heating Mantles

karen b

COMMITTEE
We do use them mainly in A level chemistry. We are lucky to have a class set of Quickfit glassware and use heating mantles with this.
 
Heating mantles were standard for use with quickfit at my last school. Easier to control than Bunsen burners and avoid hotspots when heating - would recommend for A-level chemistry.
 
I'd go for a set to use with our quickfit glassware (we have 6 sets) if we had plenty of money. We don't have plenty of money so we use thermostatically controlled waterbaths or, an electric hob (about £20) with a tray of sand, both these options work.
 
I'd go for a set to use with our quickfit glassware (we have 6 sets) if we had plenty of money. We don't have plenty of money so we use thermostatically controlled waterbaths or, an electric hob (about £20) with a tray of sand, both these options work.
That is good improvisation Jan's solo.
 
A big downside with heating mantles for student use is spillage. A simple spill can often permanently incapacitate a mantle. Heater/stirrers are a better option, especially with a sand bath interpolated.

Another thing to consider is the extension of time required for heating. A carefully used micro bunsen can bring 50ml of organic solution to boiling in a couple of minutes. Mantles will take considerably longer and have a much greater propensity to overshoot because the delay in heating effect works both ways.
 
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