Burette Washing

Discussion in 'Supporting Chemistry' started by Hayley P, Jun 11, 2018.

  1. Hi
    Just wondering if anyone has an alternative and/or ingenious way to clean burettes without a burette washer please?
    Thanks
    Hayley
     
  2. I wash ours with water, followed by an acetone rinse..
     
  3. I use a distilled water wash bottle to rinse them out (can't use acetone rinse as we have the acrylic burettes) then simply store them upside down with the tap open
     
    Jim and Dr Dawn like this.
  4. My usual reply when it comes to cleaning glassware in general. Get the kids to do it!!!
     
  5. Same here, they get flushed through immediately with dist. water after the practical and stored upright and open in the holder, job done ;-)
     
  6. I'm assuming you don't work in a standard state school then - as we'd be out of glassware very quickly if we asked our pupils to do washing up! Also with lessons only 50-60 minutes, in order to have enough time to do washing up, you would only have about 10 minutes practical time if you're lucky after the obligatory time wasted getting in, settling down, doing register, sticking sheets in books, ensuring all pupils have pens etc, then stamping planners, dealing with naughty kids etc. Often practicals don't get finished because it appears to take 30 minutes or more for pupils to notice that they don't have a pen or their exercise book is finished and they need to be sent to prep room to get a new one - because of course the stash in the teacher's room is depleted from previous lesson... oops in danger of starting a rant
     
    A Walter and Jade like this.
  7. With taps open I hope Dawn.:)
     
  8. Bog standard state school Carine. If i worked in a cafe and the dishes werent washed then i would be concerned but as a tech it doesnt bother me one little bit.
     
  9. Upright and open as I said ;-)
     
    l johnson likes this.
  10. It's not so much the quality of the washing up but the amount of breakages that would concern me - can't afford to keep replacing, and as I said the time factor. Do you have longer lessons then?
     
  11. We always clean with distilled and then run through acetone. Not a job I would personally like the students to do.
     
  12. When I know we have finished with them for a long period of time, I set up a retort stand with 3 or 4 double burette holders on the same stand ( a bit like a christmas tree), attach burettes and pour in diluted (5 parts water : 1 part Decon 90 mix) cleaner. Run through end of burette to remove air bubbles then leave over the weekend/week/whenever you get bored. Then drain (keep cleaning solution for next batch), place retort stand with burette taps open in large sink then simply wash through with 4-5 washes of hot water. Job done.
     
  13. Someone recently suggested using a plant trough filled with water. They put this out in the lab and the students put the used burettes in it at the end of the lesson.
     
    Beaker and Jonesy like this.
  14. I like the idea of this but don't the plant troughs have holes in them?
     
  15. Why not use a simple Burette Washer?:D:D
     
    Jonesy likes this.
  16. Dod

    Dod

    Our simple minded full-time burette washer always complains of not having enough to do :D
     
    Dave T likes this.
  17. Space and money
     

  18. It depends on whether the trough is designed to plant directly into it or just stand pots in it I think.
     
    Beaker likes this.
  19. I usually disassemble and thoroughly rinse everything with tap water then flush with distilled water. We have a mix of glass and plastic taps, so it's necessary. The one problem I had with burettes wasn't the washing, it was the drying. Took forever b/c not a lot of air movement in my room. I eventually figured out that a portable fan blowing on them overnight would result in dry burettes the next day. Saved burettes sitting for a week or two trying to dry out!
     
  20. We do the same here as we use the acrylic burettes mostly. If there is anything stuck in the point a bit of fine wire and a jigglle about and then run through with distilled water usually does the trick. But, why when they only have liquid in them do the students return them and the tips can be clogged up???